A skunk at the garden party

zumodemora

New Member
Spain Spanish
Hi everybody! I'm really interested in this idiom: to be a skunk at a garden party. Do anybody know how do we say it in Spanish? Is there a complete equivalent or we can't explain it with another sentence?


Thanks a lot and Happy Christmas! :)
 
  • LA_Andaluza

    Senior Member
    Español (Spain)
    Hola
    Por ejemplo:they felt like "a skunk at the garden party"
    Yo diría "que sobraban en la fiesta", "se sentían fuera de lugar" o "no pegaban ni con cola allí" o más despectivo "indeseables".
    Aunque se comprende si lo traduces literalmente como "las mofetas de la fiesta".
     

    Mirlo

    Senior Member
    Castellano, Panamá/ English-USA
    Hi everybody! I'm really interested in this idiom: to be a skunk at a garden party. Do anybody know how do we say it in Spanish? Is there a complete equivalent or we can't explain it with another sentence?


    Thanks a lot and Happy Christmas! :)
    We will need more context, but here is what a skunk is:
    1. A person regarded as obnoxious or despicable.
    2. A person whose company is avoided.

    Saludos,
     
    This thread is almost three years old, but I have some new ideas to add:

    In English, one would not use this idiom to describe ones own feelings of being out of place. A better idiom that has more general meaning is, "like a fish out of water." I've seen a comparable idiom, como pez fuera de agua in written Spanish. I don't know if this is a native Spanish idiom, or one that was imported into Spanish from English through translation engines, but it sounds very natural to my ear.

    Like "a skunk at a garden party" would be used by a third person to describe the appearance in some situation of an someone who is unwelcome because they are loutish, rude, crude, ill-mannered, ill-bred, poorly dressed, or whatever. It definitely means out of place, but you would never describe yourself this way. It applies only to a third person who was not wanted and did not fit in. It could also apply to someone who inserts himself into a situation where his beliefs or lifestyle are heretical, like a socialist attending a meeting of the Republican Party of the United States.

    A formal Spanish word that seems to fit rather well is desubicado, but I am not sure how native speakers of Spanish would use that word.

    Here's another thread that discussed the same idiom:

    http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=1703401
     
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