a smoke-addicted person

ida2

Senior Member
Persian - Iran
Hello,

Is "a smoke-addicted person" a correct expression? (smoke-addicted like opium-addicted, is it right?)

In fact, I want to use the expression "a smoke-opium addicted person" in a sentence, and I'm not sure whether it's right or not.
 
  • Chez

    Senior Member
    English English
    No, 'smoke-addicted' doesn't sound right.

    'An opium addict' is what we'd usually say; or 'a person addicted to (smoking) opium'.

    Do you really need to specify opium smoke?
     

    ida2

    Senior Member
    Persian - Iran
    No, 'smoke-addicted' doesn't sound right.

    'An opium addict' is what we'd usually say; or 'a person addicted to (smoking) opium'.

    Do you really need to specify opium smoke?
    Thanks. Yes, I have to imply a person who is addicted to both opium and cigarette.
     

    Chez

    Senior Member
    English English
    Ah, thanks for clarifying.

    In that case I guess you can use 'smoke-addicted' as a general term for 'addicted to smoke'.
     

    ida2

    Senior Member
    Persian - Iran
    Ah, thanks for clarifying.

    In that case I guess you can use 'smoke-addicted' as a general term for 'addicted to smoke'.
    Thank you. So, does smoke in "smoke-addicted" refer to both cigarette and opium?

    What about the expression "cigarette-addicted"? Is it right?

    Preferably, I should use both opium and smoking (refers to a smoker) in the mentioned expression. Such as "a cigarette-opium addicted person"
     

    manfy

    Senior Member
    German - Austria
    In that case I guess you can use 'smoke-addicted' as a general term for 'addicted to smoke'.
    :eek: Really???
    I very much agree with your post #2 but I couldn't bring myself to use the term 'smoke-addicted'.

    Thank you. So, does smoke in "smoke-addicted" refer to both cigarette and opium?
    Yes -- and on top of that, ANY other kind of smoke there is!
    So, if this person is rushing over to the neighbours to sniff all smoke he can whenever these neighbours are having a BBQ then yes, he's a true and verified smoke addict. :p
    The noun smoke and the noun smoking are two very different things -- to me, at least...and I'm a smoker!

    If you must be so specific, why not go with "nicotine- and opium-addicted person".
     

    ida2

    Senior Member
    Persian - Iran
    :eek: Really???
    I very much agree with your post #2 but I couldn't bring myself to use the term 'smoke-addicted'.


    Yes -- and on top of that, ANY other kind of smoke there is!
    So, if this person is rushing over to the neighbours to sniff all smoke he can whenever these neighbours are having a BBQ then yes, he's a true and verified smoke addict. :p
    The noun smoke and the noun smoking are two very different things -- to me, at least...and I'm a smoker!

    If you must be so specific, why not go with "nicotine- and opium-addicted person".
    Thanks a lot. Yeah, I agree with "nicotine- and opium-addicted person", but can I use the form "nicotine-opium-addicted person"?

    And, how about "cigar-opium-addicted person"?
     

    manfy

    Senior Member
    German - Austria
    ...but can I use the form "nicotine-opium-addicted person"?

    And, how about "cigar-opium-addicted person"?
    No, in both cases.
    English word formation rules don't allow that. The ad hoc word "cigar-opium-addicted" would have to be interpreted as addicted to opium that comes from cigars. :eek:o_O And that is semantically nonsensical as far as I know.

    So, you need the 'and' between the 2 substances: nicotine and opium addicted and cigar and opium addicted (I do prefer the version without hyphens!)
     
    Last edited:

    ida2

    Senior Member
    Persian - Iran
    No, in both cases.
    English word formation rules don't allow that. The ad hoc word "cigar-opium-addicted" would have to be interpreted as addicted to opium that comes from cigars. :eek:o_O And that is semantically nonsensical as far as I know.
    So, is the form "nicotine- and opium-addicted person" definitely OK?
     

    manfy

    Senior Member
    German - Austria
    So, is the form "nicotine- and opium-addicted person" definitely OK?
    For that you better wait for native speakers! I'm not sure if it's customary to put the hyphen after nicotine in this kind of contraction.
    ...maybe that's why I prefer the non-hyphenated version... :p:rolleyes:
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    It would sound much more natural the other way round, i.e. with "person" at the beginning of the expression rather than at the end: A person addicted to nicotine and opium.
    If you want to put the modifiers first and the main noun at the end, it helps to keep it simple. An addicted person is generally called an addict. Use this word, and you no longer need hyphens to modify the adjective "addicted".
    Just say "a nicotine and opium addict".
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I'm sorry if I'm several posts behind the power-curve:(.

    "Smoke-addicted" makes no sense to me: it means addicted to smoke -
    smoke being the noun, not the verb.

    You could say "smoking-addicted"= addicted to smoking.

    But if I understand the OP aright, the phrase we're looking for is "addicted to nicotine and opium".
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top