a sneak-peek

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  • GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    What do you do when you get a sneak-peek? You look at something.

    A sneak-peek is a chance to see something before it is given to the general public for viewing.

    The exhibit will not open until next week, but the museum director gave us a sneak peek today.

    The friends of the film producer got a sneak peek at the completed portions of the new movie he is producing.
     

    NickJunior

    Senior Member
    Khmer
    What do you do when you get a sneak-peek? You look at something.

    A sneak-peek is a chance to see something before it is given to the general public for viewing.

    The exhibit will not open until next week, but the museum director gave us a sneak peek today.

    The friends of the film producer got a sneak peek at the completed portions of the new movie he is producing.

    Oh Ok. That is easy to understand. Thank you GWB. So when a person is given a "sneak peek", that person gets to see something BEFORE other people.
     

    sasako

    Member
    German
    What does this mean: short preview? Does a sneak peek usually show only a shortened version of the movie you want to watch / the exhibition you want to attend? By other words, can I only get a glimpse on it?
    I know this expression from German cinemas, too, where it is used to describe a preview of a new movie - but as far as I know, you can see the full version of the movie and not only a shortened one.
     
    I think "sneak a peek", at least in other contexts, does usually imply a brief furtive look, for instance, when someone might sneak a peek at an unwrapped Christmas present destined to be given to them. (Or even try to pull back part of the paper of a wrapped present to see if they can figure out what it is.)

    Naturally you would do this as quickly as possible, hoping not to be caught by others. :)

    But I would never understand a sneak preview of a film to mean a shortened version rather than the whole film, not at all.

    I suppose what's "sneaky" about the showing is that only certain people get to see it, not the general public, so there's an element of hiding what you're doing from others, but not in terms of the time you're taking to run the film and talk about it later with the fellow attendees.

    (Somewhat close to the point Kevin Beach was making, I think, in his post #9. I loved "...implies, sometimes disingenuously:thumbsup::D...")

    (It also sometimes gives producers the chance to make changes to the film based on any negative reactions before release to the general public, which is one of the motivations for doing this in the first place.)

    It could sometimes be that, as GWB points out in post #2, just the completed portions of the film are shown, but to me that's not what the phrase means as a stand-alone idiom.
     
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    wolfbm1

    Senior Member
    Polish
    So, when you sneak a peek at something, you are looking at something which is not allowed to see or which has not been oficially released. This viewing is done either secretly or only for the chosen few.
    I have recently seen the phrase on CNN International and I found on the Net this example (from the programme REVEALED):. "Watch a sneak peek of skyscraper climber Alain 'Spiderman' Robert as he makes one of his legendary climbs at the GDF Suez building in Paris' business district. You can catch the full story on Wednesday 21 April as CNN’s Revealed steps into Robert's daredevil world." So, CNN can allow the viewers to sneak a peek (almost secretly) at a programme that will be broadcast in full later.
     
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