a / some / any

buttle

Senior Member
France French
Hi everyone are these 3 phrases the same ? :

"is there any difference ?"
"is there some difference ?"
"is there a difference ?"

Are the three of them correct at least ? do they all mean the same or is there a little difference ? thank you
 
  • I think if you use any, you are making refference to not any concrete detail, it doesn't matter which the difference is.
    But if you use some you are making refference to a group of details, which you must choose.
    An so, if you say a difference, you are asking for confirmation.

    Try this, but ask for others.
     

    Shimrod

    Senior Member
    English - United States (Southern New England)
    buttle:

    There really isn't any difference between "Is there any difference" and "Is there a difference". They are probably heard equally often. No problem there.

    "Is there some difference?" - unusual, but perfectly correct construction. You won't hear it much, but if you say it, everyone will know what you mean, and you might even win a reputation as a colorful conversationalist!
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Hi everyone are these 3 phrases the same ? :

    "is there any difference ?"
    "is there some difference ?"
    "is there a difference ?"

    Are the three of them correct at least ? do they all mean the same or is there a little difference ? thank you
    There's little between is there any difference? and is there a difference?, but is there some difference? is used when a person has suggested that there really is a difference between to apparently similar things.

    You are shown two apparently identical plates and told that one is much more valuable than the other, you'd say: is there some difference, then? The question carries a slight nuance of surprise and acknowledgement of a possible difference. Is there any difference? sounds disbelieving and sceptical by comparison.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top