A special question with a statement structure in spoken?

ticcota

Senior Member
Japanese
Hi,

I was taught it's correct to use a statement sentence with a question tone at the end of the sentence to make it a general question in spoken English, but I wonder if it's also correct to ask a special question with a statement structure in SPOKEN English, for example:

In a general question case, in stead of saying "have you done that?", it's also correct to say "you have done that?"

But in a special question case, in stead of saying "why did you say that?", in SPOKEN English, is it also correct to say "why you said that?"

And another instance: in stead of saying "what have you done?", is it also okay to say "what you have done?"

Thank you.
 
  • Marzena

    Member
    POLAND - Polish
    In a general question case, in stead of saying "have you done that?", it's also correct to say "you have done that?"

    To me, the two questions have slightly different meanings. The second one, 'you have done that?' may express surprise after somebody says what they have done.
    "I've signed up for Spanish classes."
    "Really? You have done that?"

    But let's wait until we hear from native speakers.


     

    hyperslow

    Senior Member
    Polish
    not a native speaker but why shouldn't I give it a whirl.
    I incline towards:
    You have done that, haven't you?

    edit: I know it's a bit different pair of shoes, yet...
     
    Last edited:

    Aardvark01

    Senior Member
    British English (Midlands)
    Your "wh" questions "why you said that?" and "what you have done?" are not complete questions in the way you intend. They are, however, both examples of part of indirect questions:

    "He wants to know why you said that."
    "He wants to know what you have done."

    or reported speech:

    A - "I told him what I have done with the key."
    B - "What you have done?"
    A - "I hid it under the door mat."
     

    grubble

    Senior Member
    British English
    In a general question case, in stead of saying "have you done that?", it's also correct to say "you have done that?" :tick:

    But in a special question case, in stead of saying "why did you say that?", in SPOKEN English, is it also correct to say "why you said that?" :cross:

    And another instance: in stead of saying "what have you done?", is it also okay to say "what you have done?" :cross::

    Thank you.
    You could say "You have done that why? With a very big rising inflection on the "why".

    Also you can say "You have done WHAT?"
     
    Last edited:

    Aardvark01

    Senior Member
    British English (Midlands)
    Sorry, but how about sequence of Tenses? Maybe "I told him what I HAD done with the key?"
    You are correct to point out the difference in tenses, but in speech we do often elide "have" to "I've" or drop it altogether. I could also have written it "I've told him what I've done..." but then the point was to show how the statement "What you have done" can become a question in reported speech rather than focussing on correct structure.
     
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