a spell without interruption

SuprunP

Senior Member
Ukrainian & Russian
Zellaby took a less casual view of it, but waited until the Sunday afternoon before putting the matter to his son-in-law. Reasonably certain, then, of a spell without interruption he led Alan to deck-chairs under the cedar tree on the lawn where they would not be overheard. Once they were seated he came to the point with quite unusual directness.
(The Midwich Cuckoos; J. Wyndham)

Does it mean that he was reasonably certain that they were not going to be interrupted during the period of time they were going to talk?

Thanks.
 
  • dadane

    Senior Member
    English (London/Essex)
    I think so, yes. A 'spell' is yet another word which can be used to describe a short but indeterminate period of time.

    'I did a spell in prison'
    'There's a spell of rain coming'

    Cross-posted
     
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