a spirit or psyche

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palabra86

Senior Member
Spanish
In this context, a psyche means soul?
The Phoenix it bursts into flames and turns into an egg and then you get a new Phoenix. so that's a symbol of transformation, it's a symbol of transformation. the bird is a spirit or psyche and so here's what it means in part.
From video, subject is psychology
 
  • Ponyprof

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    In this context, a psyche means soul?
    The Phoenix it bursts into flames and turns into an egg and then you get a new Phoenix. so that's a symbol of transformation, it's a symbol of transformation. the bird is a spirit or psyche and so here's what it means in part.
    From video, subject is psychology
    In this context the *author* is conflating psyche and spirit. Since the author is playing with mythical concepts here with the Phoenix you might find it interesting to look up the mythical roots of the Greek word psyche. It is more than mind.

    Some psychological writing is very precise about its terms. In particular anything to do with brain research is going to deploy a careful scientific vocabulary. Such authors would never conflated mind and brain, let alone brain and spirit

    But some pyschological writing is meant to be inspirational and impressionistic and makes no such distinction. Moreover there is a strand of such writing that loves to reference myths and legends as metaphors for human experience (if you like this you will love Jung and his ideas of archetypes).

    I think you have an example of the latter sort of "psychological" writing. Unless the author or speaker continues on to define or clarify the terms, expect concepts like mind/ brain / spirit/ soil/ psyche to stay somewhat muddled.
     

    palabra86

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    In this context the *author* is conflating psyche and spirit. Since the author is playing with mythical concepts here with the Phoenix you might find it interesting to look up the mythical roots of the Greek word psyche. It is more than mind.

    Some psychological writing is very precise about its terms. In particular anything to do with brain research is going to deploy a careful scientific vocabulary. Such authors would never conflated mind and brain, let alone brain and spirit

    But some pyschological writing is meant to be inspirational and impressionistic and makes no such distinction. Moreover there is a strand of such writing that loves to reference myths and legends as metaphors for human experience (if you like this you will love Jung and his ideas of archetypes).

    I think you have an example of the latter sort of "psychological" writing. Unless the author or speaker continues on to define or clarify the terms, expect concepts like mind/ brain / spirit/ soil/ psyche to stay somewhat muddled.
    Thanks for this wonderful explantion and recommendation I will for sure check it :)
     
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