a spiritual warfare

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  • Michelle Green

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I want to write a title to describe a movie: (A) Spiritual Warfare in a Christian's Family
    I'm not sure whether I should add "a" because I saw "warfare" is uncountable while there are so many results of "a spiritual warfare" on the Internet.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    Warfare is uncountable. You don't want an article.

    If you have seen results for "a spiritual warfare", they are probably such that the article belongs to the next word.
    Example: "A spiritual warfare prayer" or "a spiritual warfare study". So it's "a prayer" and "a study", with the noun "warfare" used as an adjective to modify the following word.
     

    Michelle Green

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Warfare is uncountable. You don't want an article.

    If you have seen results for "a spiritual warfare", they are probably such that the article belongs to the next word.
    Example: "A spiritual warfare prayer" or "a spiritual warfare study". So it's "a prayer" and "a study", with the noun "warfare" used as an adjective to modify the following word.
    Thank you.
     

    Michelle Green

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I have one more question, could anyone help me?
    Everyone will experience spiritual warfare in the course of belief in God.
    Is the red part grammatically right?
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    It is grammatically correct, but what does it mean? I have a feeling that 'warfare' is not the right word in this sentence. Perhaps you mean 'struggles'.
     

    Michelle Green

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    It is grammatically correct, but what does it mean? I have a feeling that 'warfare' is not the right word in this sentence. Perhaps you mean 'struggles'.
    Thank you for your help. :) The intended meaning is: Everyone will experience many spiritual battles in the course of belief in God. For some reason, I need to use "spiritual warfare" instead of "spiritual battles" here. Do the two mean the same?
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    ‘Spiritual warfare’ is religious jargon for the supposed battle a Christian has against evil spirits/demonic forces.

    Spiritual warfare - Wikipedia

    Spiritual warfare is the Christian concept of fighting against the work of preternatural evil forces. It is based on the biblical belief in evil spirits, or demons, that are said to intervene in human affairs in various ways.[1] Various Christian groups have adopted practices to repel such forces, as based on their doctrine of Christian demonology. Prayer is a common form of spiritual warfare among Christians.[2] Other practices may include exorcism, the laying on of hands, fasting, and anointing with oil.

    A Christian Family’s Spiritual Warfare/The Spiritual Warfare Experienced by a Christian Family might be a couple of other options. :)
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Post #13 offers one meaning: that of an actual combat against evil beings that are metaphysical. But not all religions (and not all Christian religions) believe that "evil demons" exist.

    I think that "spiritual warfare" is often used with other meanings, since "warfare" is often used with meanings other than "physical combat".

    Everyone will experience spiritual warfare in the course of belief in God.
    I want to write a title to describe a movie: (A) Spiritual Warfare in a Christian's Family
    I suspect that OP is not saying that the family was fighting real demons using exorcism. More likely OP is using "warfare" to mean "a major struggle, as difficult as fighting in a war".

    But I may be wrong, since OP does not tell us what she means by "spiritual warfare".
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    The meaning never became clear to me either. Is this about an internal struggle one person has with their beliefs or about the difficulties one Christian has with non-Christian family members?
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    Post #13 offers one meaning: that of an actual combat against evil beings that are metaphysical. But not all religions (and not all Christian religions) believe that "evil demons" exist.

    I think that "spiritual warfare" is often used with other meanings, since "warfare" is often used with meanings other than "physical combat".

    I suspect that OP is not saying that the family was fighting real demons using exorcism. More likely OP is using "warfare" to mean "a major struggle, as difficult as fighting in a war".

    But I may be wrong, since OP does not tell us what she means by "spiritual warfare".
    I agree that not all Christian religions necessarily believe in evil demons, but in my experience the religions that use that expression do, and are referring to Satanic evil forces. They feel the evil in the world is the influence of Satan and his demons, which Christians need to be vigilant against, not that they necessarily use exorcism in the battle. :)
     
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