a standing vote in which the members stand to be counted <for or against>

park sang joon

Senior Member
Korean
Members of the House of Representatives may vote in four different ways. The most common method is the voice vote. Members in favor of a bill say "yea," while those opposed say "nay." The speakers of the Hose then judges which side has the most voice votes and announce the result. If any member feels that the Speaker is mistaken, the the Speaker can be forced to call for a standing vote in which the members stand to be counted for or against.
[Source: Reading for Results Ninth Edition by Laraine Flemming]
I think "for or against" plays the role of a complement of "be used" with the implied object "a bill."
And I'd like to know if my assumption is right.
Thank you in advance for your help.
 
  • TimLA

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    If any member feels that the Speaker is mistaken,
    the the Speaker can be forced to call for a standing vote
    in which the members stand to be counted for or against.

    in which the members stand to be counted if their vote is for (in support of) the measure or against (the measure being considered).
     

    wind-sky-wind

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    "For" and "against" are prepositions, and usually precede the objects.
    In this case, however, "for or against" is used as a set phrase without any object.

    So, you don't have to think about the implied object.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top