a stick of fillet

Silver

Senior Member
Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
Hi,

I walked by a store selling pork fillet like this. I asked my cousin if he wants a few "sticks", because the meat is connected in a stick, as the picture shows,

I said "Want a stick of fillet"?

I wonder if bold is used correctly.

Thanks a lot
 
  • Erebos12345

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Hi

    We usually call them kebabs.

    Kebab - Wikipedia
    Kebabs are various cooked meat dishes, with their origins in Middle Eastern cuisine. Many variants are popular throughout Asia, and around the world.

    In most English-speaking countries, a kebab is commonly the internationally-known shish kebab or shashlik,[1][2] though outside of North America a kebab may be the ubiquitous fast-food doner kebab or its variants.[2][3] In contrast, in Indian English[4][5] and in the languages of the Middle East, other parts of Asia, and the Muslim world, a kebab is any of a wide variety of grilled meat dishes. Some dishes ultimately derived from Middle Eastern kebab may have different names in their local languages, such as the Chinese chuanr.
    Want a pork/lamb/beef kebab?
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Erebos, it's done Chinese style, and so I don't think I'd call it a kebab. We have skewered meats here too and they are called satay.

    Silver, I'm happy about calling them sticks or skewers of pork. (Fillet makes me think of fish.)
     

    Erebos12345

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Yeah. Kebab usually evokes middle-eastern cuisine, for sure. But it was still the first thing that came to mind. Pork skewer works fine too. See the part from the Wikipedia article that I highlighted in red.
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    Thanks a lot, Erebos, Nat and Little Ripper.

    I took a look at these two pictures and they are very common to be seen and eaten here as well. :)

    If I want to ask my cousin whether he wants one or two, can I say:

    Want a Chinese pork skewer?

    And two:

    Want some Chinese pork skewers?

    (I think I'd omit "Chinese" because it's understood in the context.)

    Please enlighten again, teachers.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    In an informal context, I'm happy with stick.

    Would you like one or two sticks of pork?
    Would you like one or two pork skewers?
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    If it's very informal, I might say: 'You want one or two sticks of pork?'
     
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