A Stick-Up Job

Magixo

Senior Member
Croatian
The stick-up job brought thousand pounds to them.

Has anybody got an idea of the job they did? I have no clue.
 
  • Starfrown

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Envie's right, though I don't think I've ever heard "stuck-up" before. Surely "stick-up" comes from the phrase "stick 'em up," where "'em" is a colloquial pronunciation of "them"; it means "put your hands up."
     
    Last edited:

    Magixo

    Senior Member
    Croatian
    Well, thank you for replying. Now, look at the whole article title:

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/1447177/Stick-up-job-on-torn-bank-notes-leaves-schoolgirls-1200-richer.html

    It is very strange to me that somebody cannot tell the meaning of an expression without the whole story, but obviously that's English. Furthermore, if 'stick-up job' is a coined expression why can't I find it in any dictionary? Do we have bad English dictionaries? Finally, does the phrase 'stick-up job' have two (or more) meanings?

    Thanks,
    Magixo
     

    COTORRA

    Senior Member
    American English
    You are looking at a difference between American English and British English. In America, a "stick-up job" is a robbery at gun-point. Apparently in Britain it is the act of sticking/taping something together. :)
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    A "stick-up" is a U.S. colloquialism for armed robbery with a firearm.

    I have no idea why you cannot find it in a dictionary.
     

    Cypherpunk

    Senior Member
    US, English
    Magixo, did you try the dictionary on this web site? I found two definitions for stick up with no problem.
    By the way, in my experience, stuck-up means snooty or self-impressed. You might say you were held up (at gunpoint), though this can also mean you were simply delayed.
     
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