a stonking lead

  • rhitagawr

    Senior Member
    British English
    Yes, great word. I'd never heard it in its military sense and I didn't know its etymology was supposedly military. It can refer to steam trains. The express came stonking up the bank. There was a lot of noise and smoke. As in an artillery bombardment, I suppose.
     

    cando

    Senior Member
    English - British
    It’s often used with “great” as an intensifier to describe something big and imposing, with a slightly pejorative tone; “I was going to put my car in the driveway but there’s a stonking great truck parked across the entrance!”
     

    Linkway

    Senior Member
    British English
    "Stonking" - yes, a great (informal) word, not to be confused with "stinking" even in political contexts! :)
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    AE (US English)
    In the US, I commonly hear "stinking" used as a general intensifier with no specific meaning.

    At other times it has its normal meaning of "smelly".
     
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    dojibear

    Senior Member
    AE (US English)
    Understood. I changed my wording to say it is something I commonly hear.

    Do you only hear it used meaning "smelly"? Or do you also hear it used as a generic intensifier (as I said) with a perjorative connotation (as you said)?
     

    cando

    Senior Member
    English - British
    Apparently it is from the verb "to stonk" which is World War II British military slang for a massed artillery bombardment on an enemy position.

    "5th Battery'll be stonking Jerry in the morning!" ( Urban Dictionary: stonk )

    Allegedly derived from the jargon "standard (regimental) concentration" for saturated mortar fire, abbreviated in writing to "std.conc.", hence verbal contraction to "stonc" then "stonk".
     
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    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I didn't know about its military origin and haven't heard it used for years, or should I say 'yonks'.
    'Stinking rich' is like 'filthy rich' and is derogatory. There seem to be so many more words now to indicate vast but stonking is very good for words like 'lead' or 'majority' with the idea that it's so big it will be beat and defeat opposition.
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    Apparently it is from the verb "to stonk" which is World War II British military slang for a massed artillery bombardment on an enemy position.

    "5th Battery'll be stonking Jerry in the morning!" ( Urban Dictionary: stonk )

    Allegedly derived from the jargon "standard (regimental) concentration" for saturated mortar fire, abbreviated in writing to "std.conc.", hence verbal contraction to "stonc" then "stonk".
    I read somewhere, long, long ago, that the average Tommy used "stonk" (a noun) to mean any sort of mass bombardment, and that this usage annoyed the gunners, to whom a "stonk" was a specific kind of bombardment.
     
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