A Storm In a Bra Cup

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susanb

Senior Member
Catalan-Catalonia
Hello,
I've just read this expression in one of the posts. Although I understand it, I don't know what a Bra Cup is, and I can't find it in the diccionary.
Also, is this expression "a storm in a bra cup" used a lot? Is it AE only or BE as well?
Thanks a lot!!
 
  • foxfirebrand

    Senior Member
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    It's a play on the cliche or set phrase "tempest in a teapot," meaning much ado about nothing or making a mountain out of a molehill.

    Bra sizes are measured in inches (the understrap) and "cup size," meaning how big of a rock can the pouch hold (like young King David, I have no use for bras except to sling rocks with.

    So if your torso, as measured just under the breasts, is 34 inches, and you are full-breasted, you might wear a 34C or 34D. Meaning a C-cup or a D-cup. There are also double and triple-D sizes.

    Just don't let anyone tell you that you are "a 34C." You are more than the sum of your parts-- on this I'm in wholehearted agreement with the feminists.
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    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    The expression over here is usually given as "a storm in a C-cup — and is a pun on "a storm in a tea-cup" and is usually used by sub-editors as a headline whenever an news story concerns some contretemps regardging a pneumatic young woman and her embonpoint.
     

    . 1

    Banned
    Australian Australia
    The expression over here is usually given as "a storm in a C-cup — and is a pun on "a storm in a tea-cup" and is usually used by sub-editors as a headline whenever an news story concerns some contretemps regardging a pneumatic young woman and her embonpoint.
    Wouldn't that make it 'a storm in a D-cup':) or making a mountain out of a molehill.

    .,,
     

    Paulfromitaly

    MODerator
    Italian
    The expression over here is usually given as "a storm in a C-cup — and is a pun on "a storm in a tea-cup" and is usually used by sub-editors as a headline whenever an news story concerns some contretemps regardging a pneumatic young woman and her embonpoint.
    It should be a storm in a G-cup then..:D
     

    MissFit

    Senior Member
    My, don't we get silly when discussing undergarments! I'll try to be seriously infomative. A bra cup is the part of the bra that covers the breast. A bra has two cups, one covering each breast. It's called a cup because it is shaped, more or less, like a tea cup--without the handle on the side. They are sized as Foxfirebrand described. A C-cup is a large size.
     

    susanb

    Senior Member
    Catalan-Catalonia
    I new it was a funny expression and that it may cause some laughter, but I was interested in knowing if it's used a lot (the expression, I mean :) ), and if it's AE or BE.

    Hello,
    I've just read this expression in one of the posts. Although I understand it, I don't know what a Bra Cup is, and I can't find it in the diccionary.
    Also, is this expression "a storm in a bra cup" used a lot? Is it AE only or BE as well?
    Thanks a lot!!
     

    GenJen54

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    I have never heard of this particular expression. I've only heard of "tempest in a teapot" which makes more logical sense to me, because when one is boiling water, one is literally creating a hot, steaming environment - much like a spring thunderstorm.

    "Storm in a bra cup" is cute, but to me, it sounds like one of those puns made up by someone who was trying too hard. It's fun, but just doesn't have much impact.
     

    susanb

    Senior Member
    Catalan-Catalonia
    I have never heard of this particular expression. I've only heard of "tempest in a teapot" which makes more logical sense to me, because when one is boiling water, one is literally creating a hot, steaming environment - much like a spring thunderstorm.

    "Storm in a bra cup" is cute, but to me, it sounds like one of those puns made up by someone who was trying too hard. It's fun, but just doesn't have much impact.
    Thank you so much, GenJen54!
     

    foxfirebrand

    Senior Member
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    I've only heard of "tempest in a teapot" which makes more logical sense to me, because when one is boiling water, one is literally creating a hot, steaming environment - much like a spring thunderstorm.
    Oh boy! Just when I was in the mood to be insufferably nitpicky and pedantic.

    I do believe one boils water in a kettle-- not a teapot. By such minutiae of imprecision do civilizations crumble. And while we're at it, do try the cucumber samwiches-- they're right off the vine.
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    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Tempest in a teapot is completely alien to me.
    Storm in a tea-cup is familiar.
    It's a short step to storm in a T-cup and the punning version, storm in a C-cup ....

    I don't think a British audience would need this to be further explained as a storm in a bra-cup. That sounds very, very US-speak to me.

    I found "storm in a tea-cup" dating from 1854.
    The sense is to trivialise the fuss by comparing it with the size of the storm that might possibly arise on an area of water the size of a cup.
     

    foxfirebrand

    Senior Member
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    I don't think a British audience would need this to be further explained as a storm in a bra-cup. That sounds very, very US-speak to me.
    Not to me, Panj. Here we talk of C-cups, not "bra cups." Of course by "we" I don't mean myself and everyone else in the country-- just the ones I've only ever talked with or listened to or seen on TV.
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    mjscott

    Senior Member
    American English
    Though I've never heard the expression, I think it should be storm in a B cup. That's for the pre-pubescent wannabes (and surgery candidates) who think that life would be oh-so-much more exciting in a D cup!

    Oh, well, I guess enough is said. Anymore said, and we would be creating a tempest in a teakettle!
     
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