a straight shot 100 miles

Discussion in 'English Only' started by flowersophy, Aug 16, 2015.

  1. flowersophy

    flowersophy Senior Member

    Jiangxi China
    Chinese-China
    Hi,

    Does "a straight shot 100 miles" mean "100 miles in a crow line"? Here is the context of the expression:

    - This border, which is established by the Gadsden Purchase, this is a straight shot 100 miles to the Rio Grande.
    - It's amazing.
    - It's a pretty straight shot and then this flatland goes a long way.
    (Quoted from a documentary TV series The Desert Speaks)

    Thanks very much!
     
  2. Copyright

    Copyright Senior Member

    Penang
    American English
    Yes. Or without the crow idiom, it is a straight line of 100 miles.

    Added: I came back to say "as the crow flies," not "in a crow line," which is amusing but unknown (until now). :)
     
  3. Chez Senior Member

    London
    English English
    The phrase is 'as the crow flies' (in a straight line).

    I would say your interpretation of the text seems to be right, although perhaps an American would have a clearer idea.
     
  4. sound shift

    sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    Yes, I as a BrE speaker am not sure about the second part: If "a straight shot" means "as the crow flies", does "It's a pretty straight shot" mean that the actual route (on the ground) to the Rio Grande is pretty straight?
     
  5. WyomingSue

    WyomingSue Senior Member

    Cheyenne, WY
    English--USA
    The southern boundary of New Mexico was established by the Gadsden Purchase. The boundary line on a map is a straight line for about 100 miles west of the Rio Grande River. I don't know if you can actually walk in a straight line if you're on the ground. There's probably a lot of rocks and gullies and hills.
     

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