A strange sentence structure that make me struggle so much!

thien_than_dem

Member
Vietnamese
I learn Effortless English by Aj Hoge. In one lesson, I see a strange sentence structure make me can not understand.
" The problem is it continued further into our relationship, up to the point when I found out I was pregnant"
What is the meaning of the phrase "The problem is it continued"
Why do the author don't use "The problem continued" instead of "The problem is it continued?
Could you give me some example about that structure? Thanks.

Quoation source: Effortless English by Aj Hoge, CD1, Level 2 - Lession: Bad Choises
 
  • Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    "It" is not the problem. The problem is the continuation of "it." The problem is that "it" continued.
    I began eating a piece of cake after lunch.
    The problem is (that) it continued until I became very fat.
    "Eating a piece of cake after lunch" is not the problem. The problem is that I continued doing it until I was very fat.
     

    thien_than_dem

    Member
    Vietnamese
    "It" is not the problem. The problem is the continuation of "it." The problem is that "it" continued.
    I began eating a piece of cake after lunch.
    The problem is (that) it continued until I became very fat.
    "Eating a piece of cake after lunch" is not the problem. The problem is that I continued doing it until I was very fat.
    'tt
    Sorry, but I don't understand, could you speak clearly?
     
    Last edited:

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    We would need the context of the sentence to make it really clear.
    There is something in the context which the word "it" in the sentence refers to. Let's call it "the thing." "It" is "the thing." This "thing" itself is not "the problem."
    "The problem" is that "the thing" continued to happen.
    "The problem" = "the thing continued to happen."
    Your change to "The problem continued..." is a change in meaning. The original sentence says "the thing" continued and that "the thing continuing" is a problem.
     

    thien_than_dem

    Member
    Vietnamese
    We would need the context of the sentence to make it really clear.
    There is something in the context which the word "it" in the sentence refers to. Let's call it "the thing." "It" is "the thing." This "thing" itself is not "the problem."
    "The problem" is that "the thing" continued to happen.
    "The problem" = "the thing continued to happen."
    Your change to "The problem continued..." is a change in meaning. The original sentence says "the thing" continued and that "the thing continuing" is a problem.
    Now, I understand it. Thank you!
     

    bennymix

    Senior Member
    I think Myridon explained things quite well. The writer does not say "The problem continued..." since that's a different meaning. Example. My landlord harassed me all last week. This week, the problem continued.
    The reference is to harassment.

    Myr's example in post #2 is a good one. I ate a piece of cake last Monday. However that created a craving and so I ate pieces of cake every day. So I say, "The problem is, "it" [eating of cake] continued up to the present, and I'm getting fat."

    There can be many examples of these constructions. You made a valid criticism of my work last week, and I tried to change my ways. You then, every day made further criticisms, and it [making criticisms] continued. The problem is not your original criticism, but that it [making criticisms] continued after, every day.

    It rained last week and the storm drains handled the situation. The problem is, it continued to rain for days after, and we got flooded.



    I learn Effortless English by Aj Hoge. In one lesson, I see a strange sentence structure make me can not understand.
    " The problem is it continued further into our relationship, up to the point when I found out I was pregnant"
    What is the meaning of the phrase "The problem is it continued"
    Why do the author don't use "The problem continued" instead of "The problem is it continued?
    Could you give me some example about that structure? Thanks.

    Quoation source: Effortless English by Aj Hoge, CD1, Level 2 - Lession: Bad Choises
     
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