a synonym for "replenish"

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Dear friends!!!

I would like to ask you for advice and suggestions on the following sentence/context:

"In this paper we have made an attempt to .... the existing theory of the method"

The word to be inserted is synonymous with "replenish", but "replenish" is used to talk about supplying something with something, for example, a warehouse with some goods: flour, grain, millet, cereals, oats, etc. Also we can, for example, replenish a bookshop with books. In my sentence the meaning is similar, but I would like to convey the idea that I add something new to the existing theory of some method. In other words, I make contribution to its enhancement and development. What word(s) do you think best fit(s) the gap:

1) augment
2) supplemement
3) enrich
4) widen
5) update
6) reinforce
7) strengthen
8) advance

I am especially interested to know whether either "augment" or "supplement" is OK.

Thanks a lot!!!
 
  • Archstudent

    Senior Member
    English - North London
    I would probably say develop. In this paper we have made an attempt to develop the existing theory of the method.

    This can mean add to and/or improve, and it is a word used to talk about ideas or situations in this idiom.
     
    I would probably say develop. In this paper we have made an attempt to develop the existing theory of the method.

    This can mean add to and/or improve, and it is a word used to talk about ideas or situations in this idiom.
    Thanks!!! Yes, "develop" is possible here, of course, but I did not include it in the list intentionally because I know that this word will work. However, "develop", though is very similar, means a slightly different thing. When we develop something we actually create it on the basis of the task we have faced and tools that we have. We develop software, algorithms, ideas, etc. My idea was to say that we have developed something novel and this novelty contributed TO WHAT HAS EXISTED SO FAR. Thus, I want to emphasize that we have added something new to what we already have rather than the fact that we have created something new. Everyone knows that this method has got theoretical support but it still lacks some key points. The latter have been developed, tested and implemented and this is our contribution.

    Sorry for being too long

    Anyway, aside from "develop" which words are adequate in the sentence? Certainly, you are welcome to suggest new ones that are not on the list now

    Thanks!!!
     

    Archstudent

    Senior Member
    English - North London
    Yes, develop can mean what you have said but in fact that is the less common meaning - believe me, develop usually doesn't mean create something new in english. It means more to grow. For instance if you have a good idea, but I feel it needs to be taken further, or made to grow I would say, you have made a strong start but you need to develop it further.

    From the dictionary:
    1 grow or cause to grow and become more mature, advanced, or elaborate See note at mature . [ intrans. ] : motion pictures developed into mass entertainment | [as adj. ] ( developing) this is a rapidly developing field | [ trans. ] entrepreneurs develop their skills through trial and error.

    So develop does not principally mean to create something new, that is the second and less used definition. If you wish to emphasise your meaning you can, however, say "develop further".

    However if you are still not happy with develop, you can say reinforce or strengthen. Supplement and augment are not right for this.
     
    Thanks a lot!!! I will take into account "strengthen" and "reinforce" as possible versions here. These words mean to make something more powerful, more versatile, more theoretically and practically substantiated. This does mean what I am talking about. Nonetheless, if I translate the intended meaning from Russian into English, I will get "replenish". I know that in the context where I looked for a word "replenish" does not work and therefore I decided to ask you. My dictionary says that "augment" and "supplement" are closest, but I see now that they do not sound right.

    Thanks again and as always I will appreciate all the suggestions in favour of a particular option.

    Best
     

    liliput

    Senior Member
    U.K. English
    In the context of a theory that's already been put forward, I don't think "develop" is the right word. As I understand it the study is adding existing data to support a theory that has already been developed. For similar reasons of clarity, I would avoid using "advance".
    For your purposes, I think "reinforce" or "strengthen" would do, But corroborate would be better.
    Having said that, I'm not sure it's very scientific to design a study in order to support or reinforce a theory - this immediately implies a bias in the design and execution of the study (but at least if that's the case you're being honest about it). Studies should be done in order to test the existing theory, or to add to the existing dataset.
     
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    In the context of a theory that's already been put forward, I don't think "develop" is the right word. As I understand it the study is adding existing data to support a theory that has already been developed. For similar reasons of clarity, I would avoid using "advance".
    For your purposes, I think "reinforce" or "strengthen" would do, But corroborate would be better.
    Having said that, I'm not sure it's very scientific to design a study in order to support or reinforce a theory - this immediately implies a bias in the design and execution of the study (but at least if that's the case you're being honest about it). Studies should be done in order to test the existing theory, or to add to the existing dataset.
    Thanks!!! Liliput, you are definitely on the right track. The only thing I would like to add to your interpretation of what I have said previously is that I am not going to add existing data to the theory. You understood it correctly that the theory has already been put forward. Our purpose is to add more theoretical elements so that the theory will become more complete and consistent. You can call such a thing "data", but this word "data" does not mean "dataset", i.e. it is not synonymous with a set of vectors.

    Imagine, for example, that there is a decomposition algorithm applied to signals in order to obtain components that constitute this signal. There has already been developed the sequence of steps (=algorithm!!!) that will lead us to the set of components. But, for example, the convergence property has not as yet been proven. So in the light of this fact our contribution will be adding the proof of convergence. As you see, we actually have not invented any method or technology. Rather, we have enhanced the existing one by means of providing a rigorous proof of some mathematical issue.

    I have already pointed out that "strengthen" and "reinforce" are OK because they will tell the target reader what we have really done in the realm of signal processing with regard to this (I use "this" as if we were all aware of the method I am talking about. In fact, we are not, but it does not matter here) method.

    "Corroborate"!!! Thanks for the suggestion. Let us now see what Collins dictionary says: "to corraborate" something that has been said or reported means to provide evidence or information that supports it. I am not sure this is exactly what I mean for the same reasons as those that prevent me from choosing "develop". Maybe "corroborate" has some other meaning that are not mentioned in the dictionary?

    Liliput, your opinion of the purpose of doing scientific research does not completely coincide with mine. Very often papers are written in order to reinforce something or just to support what has been known to everyone within academic community. It does not mean that you are going to copy what someone else has published. It means that you have either used someone else's developments in your applied area or made an attempt to add something new.

    Anyway, thanks a lot!!!

    All the best
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    It is true one can advance (1) a new theory , i.e., put it forward as a new thing. However, if you refer to "... the existing theory of the method" then it is clear you are using the same word in a different way than above. This latter way to use advance (2) means "to make more advanced" (as in advanced technology) and I believe that is what you are doing. To renew often has the connotation of throwing away some older stuff and replacing it with newer ideas. This is similar to replenish (to make full again, because some leaked out). Corroborate has the implication that you have done new work which confirms earlier suspicions/theories. Supplement and advance (2) both imply the adding of something new to the existing theory.

    Let me back up and review your original goal with the sentence. Are you actually providing more detail or new components to the theory itself? Perhaps the theoretical basis is already established and you are providing new tools for implementing certain processes in the application of the theory, within specific areas of analysis/noise removal etc?
     
    It is true one can advance (1) a new theory , i.e., put it forward as a new thing. However, if you refer to "... the existing theory of the method" then it is clear you are using the same word in a different way than above. This latter way to use advance (2) means "to make more advanced" (as in advanced technology) and I believe that is what you are doing. To renew often has the connotation of throwing away some older stuff and replacing it with newer ideas. This is similar to replenish (to make full again, because some leaked out). Corroborate has the implication that you have done new work which confirms earlier suspicions/theories. Supplement and advance (2) both imply the adding of something new to the existing theory.

    Let me back up and review your original goal with the sentence. Are you actually providing more detail or new components to the theory itself? Perhaps the theoretical basis is already established and you are providing new tools for implementing certain processes in the application of the theory, within specific areas of analysis/noise removal etc?
    Thanks, JulianStuart!!! Your explanations are very helpful and important to me as usual. As regards "renew" I think that it can also be used when you add something to what has been created defore. Do you remember messages appearing on a computer screen when you want to save all the changes you have made to a file while working with/in it? This message asks use whether to renew the current results or not. It appears when we want to close the file. So I suppose "renew" does not always suggest removing older stuff. It can also mean refreshing it. Anyway, that is my understanding. I may be wrong here.

    "Advance" here is used to mean that I have enhanced (improved) the current state of some theoretical issue. I did not put forward anything because if I did I would not have used the word "existing". Nonetheless, "advance" as I see now has other meanings and one of them is the target one.

    Finally, a few words about your last extract, Julian. Your questions confirm my impression that you have managed to hit the target. Actually, I have done both. I have created new components that belong to the theoretical basis and also I have worked out some practical applications. But the latter is also considered part of the extensive theory because even applications are studied in theoretical science. For example, denoising and detrending are critical in practice and hence a lot of effort is concentrated in this area. However, at the same time denoising has now been included in the theory of wavelet analysis because one of the most effective applications of wavelets is denoising. For this reason, mathematical preliminaries are necessary in order to produce special techniques (based on wavelet analysis) aimed at noise suppression.

    I hope you have got it!!!

    Julian, what do you think about "augment", "supplement", "enrich" and "widen"?

    Thanks!!!
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Thanks, JulianStuart!!! Your explanations are very helpful and important to me as usual. As regards "renew" I think that it can also be used when you add something to what has been created defore. Do you remember messages appearing on a computer screen when you want to save all the changes you have made to a file while working with/in it? This message asks use whether to renew the current results or not. It appears when we want to close the file. So I suppose "renew" does not always suggest removing older stuff. It can also mean refreshing it. Anyway, that is my understanding. I may be wrong here.


    Julian, what do you think about "augment", "supplement", "enrich" and "widen"?

    Thanks!!!
    Hi Dmitry.
    In English (at least on the computers I've used) the message is "Do you want to save the changes?" so perhaps the words on a Russian screen are "false friends". I renew the paint in the kitchen because the walls look drab. I renew my driver's licence. I renew my interest in discrete cosine transform (I had got bored with it until recently). These all imply re-doing something, rather than doing it for the first time - a required sense when something is "new".

    After sleeping on it and sort of clearing my mind, I think the word you need is "extend". "We have extended certain aspects of the theory and this has allowed us to develop some new applications in the field of noise suppression."
     

    TekYelken

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Dear friends!!!

    I would like to ask you for advice and suggestions on the following sentence/context:

    "In this paper we have made an attempt to .... the existing theory of the method"

    The word to be inserted is synonymous with "replenish", but "replenish" is used to talk about supplying something with something, for example, a warehouse with some goods: flour, grain, millet, cereals, oats, etc. Also we can, for example, replenish a bookshop with books. In my sentence the meaning is similar, but I would like to convey the idea that I add something new to the existing theory of some method. In other words, I make contribution to its enhancement and development. What word(s) do you think best fit(s) the gap:

    1) augment
    2) supplemement
    3) enrich
    4) widen
    5) update
    6) reinforce
    7) strengthen
    8) advance

    I am especially interested to know whether either "augment" or "supplement" is OK.

    Thanks a lot!!!
    Hi back Dmitry,

    The word update does not sound right because it gives the impression that the theory must be updated regularly. I think you should not limit yourself to one word for the sake of brevity but try to reconstruct the sentence. I would probably try something like:

    "In this paper we have made an attempt to review the existing theory of the method and show that it lacks completeness. We also have made an attempt to help in its conclusion by introducing new...."

    Just an idea.

    Max.
     
    Hi Dmitry.
    In English (at least on the computers I've used) the message is "Do you want to save the changes?" so perhaps the words on a Russian screen are "false friends". I renew the paint in the kitchen because the walls look drab. I renew my driver's licence. I renew my interest in discrete cosine transform (I had got bored with it until recently). These all imply re-doing something, rather than doing it for the first time - a required sense when something is "new".

    After sleeping on it and sort of clearing my mind, I think the word you need is "extend". "We have extended certain aspects of the theory and this has allowed us to develop some new applications in the field of noise suppression."
    Dear Julian!!! Thanks once again!!! To tell the truth both your suggestion and that of liliput have been used by me previously, i.e. I often use "extend" and "expand" in similar contexts because they are quite suitable for the cases when something (a theory) becomes stronger, more powerful and complete.

    Nonetheless, one thing still prevents me from sleeping!!! :):):). What about "augment", "supplement", "enrich", and "widen"? In one of the posts above I read the opinion that "augment" and "supplement" were wrong in this context. I know that natives definitely inderstand grammar and lexical choice matters far better than learners and even if some reference book tells us that the word is OK, it may on the contrary in fact. However, even natives sometimes make too hasty decisions because they do not know the field I am speaking about perfectly well. All opinions are invaluable for me but I would like to hear more viewpoints about the four words I have given. Thanks!!!
     
    Hi back Dmitry,

    The word update does not sound right because it gives the impression that the theory must be updated regularly. I think you should not limit yourself to one word for the sake of brevity but try to reconstruct the sentence. I would probably try something like:

    "In this paper we have made an attempt to review the existing theory of the method and show that it lacks completeness. We also have made an attempt to help in its conclusion by introducing new...."

    Just an idea.

    Max.
    Yes, my friend, the matter with "update" has already been settled successfully, I think. The only thing I find disputable in your explanation is that we normally update something regularly, i.e. at the same pace. Do we? That is possible but not necessary. In other words, we can update something only once a year or every day. That depends. "Update" is "similar" to "renew" because when updatin something you contribute new results, opinions or facts to what you have been working on so that this thing becomes more advanced and fresh (=containing the elements of novelty).

    Your extract suggesting that I perephrase my original sentence sounds right. At least I see now that you have undertood the core of the problem correctly. However, if I were satisfied with the possibility of modifying my sentence, I would not probably have started this thread. Substitutions are always possible. If you are able to find those that are adequate you are lucky because sometimes you might forget a word and in this case your ability to find synonyms will prove useful. Here, however, I am more interested in how different words can or cannot be used to convey the intended idea.

    All the best
     

    warmblood

    Member
    USA
    Tagalog
    Replenish applies exactly what the dictionary suggests, that is , to fill again, to make full , or to top up depleted inventory.
     
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    shiningstar

    Senior Member
    turkish
    I would choose the option 8, namely "advance". You have an already existed theory and you are adding something new into it. Something that can "streghten", "widen", "enrich (obviously)", and "improve" the theory or the method without changing the basis or taking some old stuff out. In my opinion the word "advance" conveys all these meanings.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I often use "extend" and "expand" in similar contexts because they are quite suitable for the cases when something (a theory) becomes stronger, more powerful and complete.

    Nonetheless, one thing still prevents me from sleeping!!! :):):). What about "augment", "supplement", "enrich", and "widen"?
    I personally think that for a theory, the best (sounding) word is extend - expand works too). A theory is, well, very conceptual and augment and supplement sound too concrete (maybe I think ce-ment :D ) for me, and carry a "bolt-on" connotation, while a theory becomes more complex or interwoven - one doesn't simply add "another car to the train". Enrich is too much of a value judgement to fit - one might describe someone else's contributions to a field as an enrichment, but with academic modesty, not one's one :( One can extend a theory so that it covers/explains a wider/broader range of phenomena but saying "We widened/broadened the theory" sounds strange ("they widened the motorway due to congestion" :D ). Many of these words could be used to describe the armamentarium of analytical "tools" that can be developed/applied as a result of the recent advances in the theoretical basis of noise suppression.

    Those are my thoughts, nay, opinions on those words
     
    I personally think that for a theory, the best (sounding) word is extend - expand works too). A theory is, well, very conceptual and augment and supplement sound too concrete (maybe I think ce-ment :D ) for me, and carry a "bolt-on" connotation, while a theory becomes more complex or interwoven - one doesn't simply add "another car to the train". Enrich is too much of a value judgement to fit - one might describe someone else's contributions to a field as an enrichment, but with academic modesty, not one's one :( One can extend a theory so that it covers/explains a wider/broader range of phenomena but saying "We widened/broadened the theory" sounds strange ("they widened the motorway due to congestion" :D ). Many of these words could be used to describe the armamentarium of analytical "tools" that can be developed/applied as a result of the recent advances in the theoretical basis of noise suppression.

    Those are my thoughts, nay, opinions on those words
    Thanks, Julian!!! Once again I repeat I wish you worked with me because your mind is acdemic like mine :):):). I have understood your ideas about "enrich" and "widen". Let us, however, return once again to "augment" and "supplement". You said that both sound too concrete, i.e. they, in your opinion, are suitable when we have already said what contribution to a theory one has made. Frankly speaking, I do not completely understand what exactly you mean by "bolt-on". I can guess that it means "optional", "not necessary", but I am not 100% sure, though. Anyway, in order not to torture you with explaining the words I suggest you give some examples with both "augment" and "supplement" with regard to my context. This will be easier for you and it will finally elucidate how these words should be used in the contexts like mine.

    All the best
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    "Specific production (ng/cell/day) of anti-cancer antibodies in this cell line could be augmented by the inclusion of a novel amino acid in the daily cell-culture broth supplement."

    "The tensile strength of the weakened I-beam assemblies on the Bay Bridge was augmented by bolting on pairs of separate reinforcing rods" (and drivers were relieved :D)

    "A list of publications showing further progress in the field has been collected into a supplement for this reissue. A new edition will be contemplated only if the basic theory is significantly revised or extended".

    Like I said, these are examples of how I use these words and the shadings I associate with them. I think many, possibly most, would understand you just fine if you used the words you are suggesting and I was just showing you how I would apply polish to get maximum shine from the wordsmithing exercise you have embarked upon :D
     
    Have you considered "reinvigorate"?
    No, I have not!!! Actually the word "reinvigorate" does not exist in my dictionary. I think you noticed the "re" in bold. I highlighted this prefix because "invigorate" itself has been found by me as opposed to "reinvigorate". I know that it is impossible to place each word with each existent prefix but usually in big dictionaries verbs with the "re" are provided. Anyway, as regards "invigorate", I have found the following:

    1) When something invigorates you, it makes you feel more energetic
    2) To invigorate a situation or a process means to make it more efficient or more effective

    Some examples from the dictionary:

    1) Take a deep breath in to invigorate you
    2) ...the promise that they would invigorate the economy
    3) To invigorate a struggling campaign

    So in sntences #2 and #3 the meanings are close to the one I need. However, can I state that "invigorate a theory" means the same as
    "strengthen/reinforce/advance" it? Will it sound OK if I say "In an attempt to invigorate a theory ...."

    Thanks!!!
     
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    "Specific production (ng/cell/day) of anti-cancer antibodies in this cell line could be augmented by the inclusion of a novel amino acid in the daily cell-culture broth supplement."

    "The tensile strength of the weakened I-beam assemblies on the Bay Bridge was augmented by bolting on pairs of separate reinforcing rods" (and drivers were relieved :D)

    "A list of publications showing further progress in the field has been collected into a supplement for this reissue. A new edition will be contemplated only if the basic theory is significantly revised or extended".

    Like I said, these are examples of how I use these words and the shadings I associate with them. I think many, possibly most, would understand you just fine if you used the words you are suggesting and I was just showing you how I would apply polish to get maximum shine from the wordsmithing exercise you have embarked upon :D
    Thank you!!!
     

    cyberpedant

    Senior Member
    English USA, Northeast, NYC
    re·in·vig·o·rate (rē'ĭn-vĭg'ə-rāt')
    tr.v. re·in·vig·o·rat·ed, re·in·vig·o·rat·ing, re·in·vig·o·rates
    To give new life or energy to.
    Link
    This seems to fill at least some of your requirements. It implies that the theory was strong before but with further contributions it can become stronger.
     
    re·in·vig·o·rate (rē'ĭn-vĭg'ə-rāt')
    tr.v. re·in·vig·o·rat·ed, re·in·vig·o·rat·ing, re·in·vig·o·rates
    To give new life or energy to.
    Link
    This seems to fill at least some of your requirements. It implies that the theory was strong before but with further contributions it can become stronger.
    Thanks, cyber!!! I have realized it now. Still as I see this usage is metaphorical rather than literal. Anyway, I will take this very useful word into account!!!

    Best
     

    cyberpedant

    Senior Member
    English USA, Northeast, NYC

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    No, I have not!!! Actually the word "reinvigorate" does not exist in my dictionary. I think you noticed the "re" in bold. I highlighted this prefix because "invigorate" itself has been found by me as opposed to "reinvigorate". I know that it is impossible to place each word with each existent prefix but usually in big dictionaries verbs with the "re" are provided. Anyway, as regards "invigorate", I have found the following:

    1) When something invigorates you, it makes you feel more energetic
    2) To invigorate a situation or a process means to make it more efficient or more effective

    Some examples from the dictionary:

    1) Take a deep breath in to invigorate you
    2) ...the promise that they would invigorate the economy
    3) To invigorate a struggling campaign

    So in sntences #2 and #3 the meanings are close to the one I need. However, can I state that "invigorate a theory" means the same as
    "strengthen/reinforce/advance" it? Will it sound OK if I say "In an attempt to invigorate a theory ...."

    Thanks!!!
    If you feel that the theory had lost its vigour (possibly, metaphorically, its rigour) and was falling by the wayside, becoming weaker, out of favour etc., as other theories became more popular, then for you to do some research and show that your theory was indeed more plausible or better supported than previously thought, then you could say "we have reinvigorated this theory" (The re- means again as in "brought to life again". Simply to invigorate does not necessarily imply it was ever lively before). However, if it has not lost its currency or liveliness, then re-invigorate may not work as well as advance or extend :D

    (Excuse me while I go and look for another word-polishing cloth)
     
    There's a link on this page to the Visual Thesaurus. If you haven't yet encountered it, it's a real treat.
    reinvigorate Synonyms:

    brace, breathe new life into, bring around, brush up, cheer, cool*, enliven, exhilarate, freshen, inspirit, jog, modernize, prod, prompt, quicken, reanimate, recreate, regain, rejuvenate, renew, renovate, repair, replenish, restore, resuscitate, revitalize, revive, revivify, stimulate, update, vivify
    Yes, it is a treat and you are a good doctor because you have prescribed a wonderful medicine for me!!! :):):) Before commenting on these words I will remind everyone of the original sentence or, rather, context:

    "In this paper we have made an attempt to .... the existing theory of the method"

    1) "Brace" - my dictionary says that one of the meanings of the word is to strengthen or supposrt something. Hence, the word could fit. :tick:

    2) "Enliven" - unlikely to be the right word because the word suggests making something crucial and critical again but the theory has laready been so for years
    3) "Exhilarate" - according to my sources, does not mean what I want to say
    4) "Prod" - again means something different, namely to urge or force someone to do something
    5) "Prompt", "regain" - a different meaning
    6) "Rejuvenate" - Great!!! Another possibility, I must say. Look what my dictionary says: :tick:

    - If something rejuvenates you, it makes you feel look or young again
    - To rejuvenate an organization or system means to make it more efficient by introducing new ideas

    Great!!!

    7) "Renovate", "repair", "restore" - a different meaning
    8) "Revitalize", "revive" - not exactly what I mean

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    "In this paper we have made an attempt to BRACE the existing theory of the method"

    "In this paper we have made an attempt to REJUVENATE the existing theory of the method"

    How do they sound?

    Thanks!!!
     
    If you feel that the theory had lost its vigour (possibly, metaphorically, its rigour) and was falling by the wayside, becoming weaker, out of favour etc., as other theories became more popular, then for you to do some research and show that your theory was indeed more plausible or better supported than previously thought, then you could say "we have reinvigorated this theory" (The re- means again as in "brought to life again". Simply to invigorate does not necessarily imply it was ever lively before). However, if it has not lost its currency or liveliness, then re-invigorate may not work as well as advance or extend :D

    (Excuse me while I go and look for another word-polishing cloth)
    Thanks!!! Yes, I know that the prefix "re" tells one about doing something again usually in attempt to succeed and obtain better results than previously. Thus, I think, "reinvigorate", in the light of your explanation, does not exactly convey the true idea behind the sentence. Probably, just "invigorate" will be better.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    I'm curious. How many words do you intend to try out? :)

    "Reinvigorate" seems to fit perfectly, from what you have described.

    "Brace" is not usually used in this context. "He braced for impact" or "we plan to brace the building to allow it to withstand further aftershocks without collapsing" would be more typical uses of the word.

    "Rejuvenate" would make sense if you are somehow "modernizing" the theory, but that doesn't appear to be what is happening.

    (Just as a side note, the "how about this word?" game usually works only for a limited amount of time in any given thread, particularly after people have provided satisfactory answers. I suggest using this technique sparingly.)
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I would take the second one to mean, we found an old theory that was gathering dust and have done some work that really supports its original intent so we have rejuvenated it (it had become old and is now young and vigorous again). If not, then your will be implying that the others who currently work in the field haven't made much progress recently - it's abit like enrich in that it's a bit of a value judgement :D

    If the theory explains a lot of things but there is one particular key piece of evidence lacking which is needed to address a particular tenet of the theory, and you have designed an experiment to test that issue, and found the outcome as predicted by the theory, then you have created a new brace that makes the theory stronger.

    Since it's hard for you to describe how the theoretical aspects of the work in the paper stands in relation to existing theory, it's hard for us to give you the absolute right word, especially as it seems tangled up in the methodological progress it affords :D
     
    "Brace" generally means to give support to something that's failing.
    "Rejuvenate" means to restore to youth something that has grown feeble.
    Thanks!!! Well, that is not exactly the same what my dictionary says. I will not repeat the definitions of the two once again since they are given in bold in the post of mine located above, but I will add a few comments to what I have said earlier.

    You claim that "rejuvenate" describes something that is feeble does not coincide exactly with what I am reading in the dictionary. For example, there is a sentence very similar to mine: "They are currently working on rejuvenating the current existing vegetation ...". "Existing" as in my example with theory. However, this may be your personal view and I will take it into consideration.

    "Reinvigorate" seems to fit perfectly, from what you have described.

    "Brace" is not usually used in this context. "He braced for impact" or "we plan to brace the building to allow it to withstand further aftershocks without collapsing" would be more typical uses of the word.

    "Rejuvenate" would make sense if you are somehow "modernizing" the theory, but that doesn't appear to be what is happening.

    (Just as a side note, the "how about this word?" game usually works only for a limited amount of time in any given thread, particularly after people have provided satisfactory answers. I suggest using this technique sparingly.)
    I see the problem with "brace". I agree, it is wrong here.

    I am modernizing the theory. As I have told many times above, creating applications and adding new theoretical components is modernizing and therefore "rejuvenate", due to what you have said, is OK.

    I will take your note into account. Thanks for reminding!!!

    I would take the second one to mean, we found an old theory that was gathering dust and have done some work that really supports its original intent so we have rejuvenated it (it had become old and is now young and vigorous again). If not, then your will be implying that the others who currently work in the field haven't made much progress recently - it's abit like enrich in that it's a bit of a value judgement :D

    If the theory explains a lot of things but there is one particular key piece of evidence lacking which is needed to address a particular tenet of the theory, and you have designed an experiment to test that issue, and found the outcome as predicted by the theory, then you have created a new brace that makes the theory stronger.

    Since it's hard for you to describe how the theoretical aspects of the work in the paper stands in relation to existing theory, it's hard for us to give you the absolute right word, especially as it seems tangled up in the methodological progress it affords :D
    Thnank you!!!
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    I am modernizing the theory. As I have told many times above, creating applications and adding new theoretical components is modernizing and therefore "rejuvenate", due to what you have said, is OK.
    Here is the key point, in my opinion, in what I read in your many previous posts:

    As you see, we actually have not invented any method or technology. Rather, we have enhanced the existing one by means of providing a rigorous proof of some mathematical issue.
    This is not modernizing. This is not rejuvenating. This is substantiating or corroborating a theory, or "proving" or "proving out" a theory or method.

    You may think that you have said something many times before, but that is not what I see in your posts. I sense some frustration in your comment "as I have told many times above." What you think you have said may not be what was communicated. Allow for some confusion when crossing language barriers.
     
    Here is the key point, in my opinion, in what I read in your many previous posts:



    This is not modernizing. This is not rejuvenating. This is substantiating or corroborating a theory, or "proving" or "proving out" a theory or method.

    You may think that you have said something many times before, but that is not what I see in your posts. I sense some frustration in your comment "as I have told many times above." What you think you have said may not be what was communicated. Allow for some confusion when crossing language barriers.
    Dear James!!! Yes, I see now, that my posts referring to different time, seem contradictory. The reason, I think, is that I cannot give the idea behind the theory because in this case I will occupy too much room and it will not be interesting to many of the participants. The only thing I can say is that the subject of the theory belongs to the realm of signal processing. Still I will repeat once again that

    Quote: "I am modernizing the theory. As I have told many times above, creating applications and adding new theoretical components is modernizing and therefore "rejuvenate", due to what you have said, is OK"

    This sentence best conveys what I and my team have been doing.

    No frustration at all in my comments with "before", "earlier", "above", and other similar words. Do you know why I have been using these linkers so often? Because I have got used to doing so. In academic writing and during the speech delivery I often have to refer back to what I have written, saidm outlined or described. This is considered an adequate style. No frustration at all!!!:)

    Confusion when crossing language barriers.... Yes, it exists and I try my best to avoid it. Frankly speaking, this saying has reminded me of one film I have recently seen when two people were speaking Spanish - one was from Spain, the other from Puerto Rico. The Spanish guy applied to his colleague using the word which means "a good person" in Spain and "testicles" in Puerto Rico. I think you can imagine what followed .... The Spanish guy was killed in the end for abusing though he did not mean to. So we should be careful with language barriers. :) Excuse me for this deviation.
     

    preppie

    Senior Member
    American English (Mostly MidAtlantic)
    I just can't resist. (re)invigorate and rejuvenate appear to fit but do not. These words are subtly associated with living things (or things which can be thought of as living). Plants, animals, the earth for farming, the law etc. These can be rejuvenated.

    If you are modernizing it then you are saying that the theory was applicable in a prior time but it may no longer be valid.

    You are, in fact, augmenting it. You are adding information, application, or new conditions which did not exist but do not diminish what was already there.

    A theory, a proof, are intellectual concepts. They are not given the attributes of life.

    You have a list of words that will fit. I suggest that if you are stumped for a word ask the question using the simplest words possible. As I read the thread, I noticed many interpretations but do not believe you really helped narrow it down.

    In science or academia, one may look at a predecessor's thesis and (as you said) add to it.. move it forward, add depth and breadth not just more numbers showing what is already know.

    You might also consider the word "amplify" well as reconsider the word "extend". as an example, "He took the original theory of relativity and extended it to the General Theory of Relativity."
     
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