a (the) business side

TommyGun

Senior Member
Hello,

Which ways to say would be right or natural?

He can understand not only a technical but business side of arising problems.
He can understand not only a technical but a business side of arising problems.
He can understand not only the technical but business side of arising problems.
He can understand not only the technical but the business side of arising problems.
 
  • Elwintee

    Senior Member
    England English
    None of the options are quite right. 'Not only' is usually followed by 'also', so one version could read "He can understand not only the technical but also the business side of arising problems". But you should leave out the word 'arising', as it is redundant. Problems always arise, or they aren't there to be dealt with. Personally I would word the sentence as follows:
    "He can understand both the technical and the business aspect of problems."
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    The option with both "the"s is the best. There is an unlikely possibility that you could use "a"s if you consider that a problem could have multiple technical sides or multiple business sides and he understands one of them, but I would think that a problem only has one of each.
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    If it is relevant in this sentence to distinguish problems that may arise in the future from current ones, you could say 'of problems that arise' or indeed 'of problems arising'.
     

    TommyGun

    Senior Member
    If it is relevant in this sentence to distinguish problems that may arise in the future from current ones, you could say 'of problems that arise' or indeed 'of problems arising'.
    He can understand not only the technical but also the business side of problems arising.

    Do you mean that this sentence is about current problems?
    If so, I don't quite understand why it is, because problems arising = problems that arise; and arise here is a general form with the meaning that can extend from the past to the future.
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    'He can understand not only the technical but also the business side of problems arising.'

    The implication of this sentence is that it refers to problems that may arise in the future.
    It indicates the ability of the individual to deal with new problems as they arise (not just pre-existing problems which he already knows about).
     
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