A throne, Adorn'd with due rites, stands you more in hand To see his person placed in

nkaper

Senior Member
russian
http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/48895/pg48895-images.html
Title: The Odysseys
Author: Homer


"Alcinous! It shews not decently, Nor doth your honour what you see admit, That this your guest should thus abjectly sit, His chair the earth, the hearth his cushion, Ashes as if apposed for food. A throne, Adorn'd with due rites, stands you more in hand To see his person placed in, and command That instantly your heralds fill in wine, That to the God that doth in lightnings shine We may do sacrifice;

Is it "It stands you more in hand to see his person placed in a throne, adorned with due rites"?
Or "a throne" is the subject in this sentence, and it is it, "a throne", that "stands you more in hand"?
And what does "stands you more in hand" mean anyway? Is it close to "makes you obliged"?
Thanks in advance.
 
  • Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It means 'You should look after him properly, place him in a throne, fill his cup with wine'.

    Echineus realised who Odysseus was and tells his king to look after him properly.

    Is it "It stands you more in hand to see his person placed in a throne, adorned with due rites"?
    It befits you to place him in a throne, and treat him with proper respect.
     

    nkaper

    Senior Member
    russian
    Thanks.

    Yes, but rearranging the sentence like this means there should not be a comma before "adorned with due rites", which modifies "throne".
    But why then in the original there is a comma before "adorn'd with due rites,"?
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    There is not only a comma before, there is a comma after too. The phrase is in parenthesis. It is adjectival to "a throne".
     
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