A tid bit nipply

irinet

Senior Member
Romanian
Hi,

I have read in a dictionary about what this phrase means, and I find it rather interesting more because I've been often experienced it, but we don't have this way of saying in my language, so I wonder if it's correct saying:

Unexpectedly, July has been a tid bit nipply this year, as we rather feel it as the hottest month in summer.

Can a man say this as well?

Thank you for every correction ticked,
 
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  • Juhasz

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    Urban Dictionary has an uncommonly useful entry for this phrase: "A word-play on the term nippy to describe cold weather and simultaneously include boobs nonchalantly in the conversation."

    More simply, that is a alteration of the more normal phrase, "a tad bit nippy." Changing "nippy" to "nipply" is slightly humorous, but will probably be seen as juvenile. Why "tad" has been changed to "tid" is a total mystery. As far as I know, "tid" is not a word. We do have a word "tidbit" but its meaning does not fit this context.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Do you mean nippy, which is a colloquial word for "cold", and is unrelated to nipples? Two ways of modifying an adjective are a tad (also quite colloquial) and a bit, so we could say: It's a bit nippy today. It's a tad nippy today. But tidbit or titbit is a different word, not used here.

    cross-posted

    If they said a titbit nipply, it would be a double pun on breasts (tit), but I've never heard or seen any such pun.
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    At first glance, I took this to be a spoonerism for something like "a tad nippy". Then I wondered if it meant that, but was also a reference to nipples protruding in cold weather.

    It's certainly not a common expression, but is vaguely understandable.
     

    irinet

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Oh, really?!
    I have just read that this phrase is a slang term. While browsing for 'nippy' in relation with weather, I've been curious about more contexts I can use it.

    So, I guess it's not appropriate to use it at all.

    Many thanks to you!
     
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    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Not appropriate to use it no, it would raise some eyebrows, but I think it's a quite amusing pun. 'Weather's a titbit nipply, isn't it!'

    I've never heard 'tadbit', only 'tad' meaning a little or a bit, only a 'titbit' meaning a 'small piece of', as in 'cocktail titbits', served in a distant more innocent past.

    I expect 'titbit' is on some people's 'avoid' list, like the birds' name 'bluetit', and the 19th century abbreviation of the girls' name Laetitia to 'Titty'.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Nippy is relating to "nip" - to bite - the cold has a bite.
    For me, "nipply" is a reference to a cold that makes your nipples stand up.
     

    Sparky Malarky

    Moderator
    English - US
    We often say "It's a bit nippy" and "There's a nip in the air" to mean the same thing - it's cold.

    Plants are "nipped" (bitten, damaged) by the frost when it's cold.
     

    irinet

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Thank you and big hugs!
    It's a proven fact that dictionaries cannot provide each and every contexts we use words for.
    And I can see now that 'a tid' is wrong.

    However, the dictionary gives 'tid' in the following context: 'tidbit' is a small piece of delicious food: He gave the dog a titbit.
     
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    irinet

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Of what I've read, as you've made me so curious, "tid" changed in tidbit, and there's also 'titbit'. Both are used as 'delicacy' of taste. Of course, what is delicious has to be tasted and not eaten.
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    Nippy is relating to "nip" - to bite - the cold has a bite.
    For me, "nipply" is a reference to a cold that makes your nipples stand up.
    Why "tad" has been changed to "tid" is a total mystery. As far as I know, "tid" is not a word. We do have a word "tidbit" but its meaning does not fit this context.
    Unless, of course, the speaker thinks of nipples as tidbits to be enjoyed....
     
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