A tire on Trump’s plane developed a flat

NewAmerica

Banned
Mandarin
Does "A tire on Trump’s plane developed a flat" mean "A tire on Trump’s plane deflated"?


Thanks in advance

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The next day, Trump flew to Indiana to do a campaign event with Pence. A tire on Trump’s plane developed a flat, so he and his son Eric, who had accompanied him, decided to stay the night. They joined the Pences for dinner at an Indianapolis restaurant.


-New Yorker

Source
 
  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Is it only me that finds the original odd? "A flat", to me, = "a flat tyre/tire".

    A tire on Trump’s plane developed a flat tire.:confused:
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    It's unremarkable. "The tire/tyre developed a flat" may just be a bit of careless tautology, but only if you think "flat" means "flat tire/tyre". If, however, you accept that it can also mean (of a tire/tyre) "deflated state", then it becomes "The tire developed a deflated state" and that's no longer tautology. Whichever meaning you prefer, it's not an unusual way to phrase the statement.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    It is standard in AE to get a flat. In the OP headline, it would normally be the plane or the wheel that “developed a flat” but the omission of tire/tyre after flat. makionf flat a noun is normal.

    flat, n.
    a deflated automobile tire.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    It may be what you expected, Loob, and it may not be grammatical, but it is something that people say, as demonstrated by the New Yorker's writer.
     
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