A topic which is interesting for young people

roh3x2n

Senior Member
Fars
Do the following sentences have the same meaning, or is the short form of the 1st one ?

I. A topic which is interesting for young people needn't necessary be politics.
II.A topic interesting young people needn't necessarily be politics


=======================

I The young people, who were sent to Washington, were very interested in politics.


II.The young people sent to Washington were very interested in politics.



Sorry for wrong thread.
i wanted in English Forum.
Can anyone move it ?
 
  • gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Do the following sentences have the same meaning, or is the short form of the 1st one ?

    I. A topic which is interesting for young people needn't necessary be politics.
    II.A topic interesting young people needn't necessarily be politics
    This is tough. II leaves out words, and I would interpret it this way:

    II.A topic [that is] interesting [to] young people needn't necessarily be politics.

    To me both sentences are awkward. I would write:

    Politics is a topic which is may not be interesting to [for] young people.

    Could you give us more context?

    Gaer
     

    downfallofutopia

    Member
    USA / English
    Do the following sentences have the same meaning, or is the short form of the 1st one ?

    I. A topic which is interesting for young people needn't necessary necessarily be politics.
    II.A topic interesting young people needn't necessarily be politics
    Ok, the short of it, is that both are correct (the second a bit more awkward, but no less correct). The difference is that the word interesting actually changes its part of speech. In the first, 'interesting' is an adjective modifying the verb 'to be' (is). In the second, the word 'interesting' is a verb ('to interest' is a verb meaining 'to be interesting'.) Incidentally, if it were me speaking, I would leave out the word 'necessarily'. To me it makes both sentences flow better. But that is just personal preference.


    I've noticed people whose primary language is reliant on the declension of a noun or the conjugation of a verb (a group that English is not a part of), to determine a words function in a sentence have trouble with this aspect of English. With time it becomes second nature.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Do the following sentences have the same meaning, or is the short form of the 1st one ?

    I. A topic which is interesting for young people needn't necessary be politics.
    II.A topic interesting young people needn't necessarily be politics


    =======================

    I The young people, who were sent to Washington, were very interested in politics.


    II.The young people sent to Washington were very interested in politics.



    Sorry for wrong thread.
    i wanted in English Forum.
    Can anyone move it ?

    The first pair mean the same thing to me but are very unusual in their construction, as others have said. If I understand what the intention of the sentence is, I would rephrase it as: "There many topics of interest to young people; politics isn't necessarily one of them."

    The second pair do not mean the same thing, in my opinion.

    The first sentence deals with one group of young people. These young people are interested in politics. We also know they were sent to Washington.

    The second sentence deals with a particular group of young people, but this group may be a smaller subset of a larger group of young people. For instance, let's say there is a group of young people interested in traveling for two reasons, arts and politics. They were divided into two smaller groups. The young people (who were) sent to Paris were very interested in arts. The young people (who were) sent to Washington were very interested in politics.

    The commas in the first sentence separate that phrase out as additional information. Without the commas, the second sentence restricts the focus to only those young people who were sent to Washington.
     

    roh3x2n

    Senior Member
    Fars
    Thanks for you replies and helps.

    Those Short formed sentences are how my teacher write them in short ways.
    I have to do the same for today's exam,but i am not sure how to construct such sentences.
    Could you please help me understand it ?
     
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