a total replacement cyborg

VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
In a dystopian future world a scientist finds a destroyed female cyborg — the head and part of the upper buddy without the limbs — in a scrapheap, brings her to his laboratory, and restores her with spare parts. When she comes to, she asks:
— And do you know who I am?
— Well, we were hoping you'd fill in that part. Since you're a total replacement cyborg and most of your cyber body was destroyed we can't find any records. But your very human brain was miraculously intact.

Alita: Battle Angel, film

What does "total replacement" mean? Is it supposed to be some established fictional term used in the story, or does it refer to the fact that he rebuilt her out of almost nothing?
Thank you.
 
Last edited:
  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    It isn't a term in itself, but I imagine the writer inserted that line of rather clunky dialogue just to tell us. Most of the cyborg's body was destroyed...and therefore replaced. Almost all of the cyborg was replaced

    Perhaps it isn't the near-total replacement of the body that makes it a "total replacement", but not having records; I very much doubt there is any distinction between these in the film.

    Quite why it is impossible to find records just because the body was destroyed, I have no idea. I would have thought it better to interrogate the cyborg's BIOS (or whatever they have) rather than looking for a little label with the serial number.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Perhaps it isn't the near-total replacement of the body that makes it a "total replacement", but not having records
    But he says that since she's "a total replacement cyborg", he can't find any records. I.e., having no records is a consequence of her being "a total replacement cyborg". Wouldn't it be the oppoiste in that case?...
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    But he says that since she's "a total replacement cyborg", he can't find any records. I.e., having no records is a consequence of her being "a total replacement cyborg". Wouldn't it be the oppoiste in that case?...
    If the two things means the same thing, then one would imply the other. It still allows the possibility that not having records is the definition of a total replacement, and therefore, since this cyborg is a total replacement, they cannot find any records.

    It might be possible to work out the meaning by knowing more context (did they actually look for records? how?), but I imagine there are too many unknowns to say for certain.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top