". . . a very close friend of hers and I."

Cholo234

Senior Member
American English
On YouTube, I heard the following in an interview: ". . . a very close friend of hers and I."

I'm thinking that "hers and I" should be "hers and me," in order to comply with the genitive case.

Can anyone affirm my idea . . . . . or not affirm it? Thanks.
 
  • Cholo234

    Senior Member
    American English
    "And shortly after that, [name omitted], a very close friend of hers and I, felt that we wanted to do a book of her work together."
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I see nothing wrong there. "I" is part of the subject.

    "I felt that I wanted to do a book..."
    "Jane, Jessie, and I felt that we wanted to do a book..."
    "Jane, a very close friend of hers, and I, felt that we ..."

    Or maybe the meaning is quite different. Who is friendly with whom, and what is going on?
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    There shouldn't be a comma after I.
    I thought about that, too but agree with Velisarius. If you omit the comma, your "pattern recognition" activity (an integral part of reading), will see " xxx yyyy zzzzz and I felt that we aaa cc ddddd" where the "I felt" looks like the beginning of an independent clause following and. Although some object, I would justify the comma as representing the pause that would be necessary in speech to convey the right meaning.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    There shouldn't be a comma after I.
    I agree. The comma separates the subject from the predicate, wrongly.
    The sentence structure is - Jane, parenthetic description of Jane, and I did something. No comma before the verb. I can't think of a situation in which a comma there could be correct, other than the presence of another parenthetic description:
    Jane, description of Jane, and I, a WR pedant, did something.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Similarly, I can't imagine saying the sentence (with its intended meaning) without some gap between "I" and "did" that was longer than the gap between "did" and "something". The same sort of gap as between "Jane" and "parenthetic description". What a messy language:eek:
     

    Dokhtaregol

    Senior Member
    Persian
    On YouTube, I heard the following in an interview: ". . . a very close friend of hers and I."

    I'm thinking that "hers and I" should be "hers and me," in order to comply with the genitive case.

    Can anyone affirm my idea . . . . . or not affirm it? Thanks.

    Sorry! I have a problem! Why do you say it should be "hers and me" and not "hers and mine"?
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Sorry! I have a problem! Why do you say it should be "hers and me" and not "hers and mine"?
    Yes, I wondered about that "very close friend of hers and me" too;).

    -------

    PS. I agree with everyone else that it should be "... and I" in the original sentence.
     
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