a very strong man

Encolpius

Senior Member
Hungarian
Hello, what do you call a strong man in your language (slang, informal expressions welcomed)?

Hungarian
vasgyúró [vas iron + gyúró "kneader", i.e: iron-kneader]
izompacsirta [izom muscle + pacsirta sparrow]

Czech
lamželezo [lámat break + železo iron, i.e: iron-breaker]
hromotluk [hrom thunder + tlučet beat, i.e: thunder-beater]

Thanks.
 
  • ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    The references to iron remind me of 'ijzervreter' in Dutch (iron-eater), but that refers to a person who is not really afraid. But of course those are strong in general.

    I also find references to 'klerenkast/ kleerkast' (clothes cupboard, lit., so like wardrobe), and mythological figures such as Hercules or fictitious characters such as 'Tarzan'. Not what you are looking for, I suppose...
     

    810senior

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    In Japanese:
    (mostly as slang)
    ガチムチ系, ガチムチ男gachimuchi kei, gachimuchi otoko (muscular style, muscular man)
    マッチョ, マッチョマンmaccho, maccho man (macho, macho man)

    I love the phrase about this originating from the COMMANDO where the voices are translated in Japanese:
    筋肉モリモリマッチョマンの変態kinniku morimori macchoman no hentai(the pervert who's muscular vigorous man) *original says:he's one gigantic motherxxcker.

    It's a well-known phrase as an internet meme in Japan as well.
     

    apmoy70

    Senior Member
    Greek
    Greek:

    «Σφίχτερμαν» [ˈsfixterman] (masc.), slangy language, a hybrid: MoGr adj. «σφιχτός» [sfiˈxtos] --> thick, firm, tense, taut < Classical deverbal adj. «σφιγκτός» spʰĭŋktós (same meanings) < Classical v. «σφίγγω» spʰíŋgō --> to bind, embrace, jam in (with obscure etymology) + Eng. man; «σφίχτερμαν» is the strongman who displays his developed musculature in public.

    «Κορμοράνος» [kormoˈɾanos] (masc.), which formally refers to the bird Cormorant (genus Phalacrocoracidae), but in slangy language is the strongman < MoGr neut. noun «κορμί» [korˈmi] --> body, physique, human torso, bod < Byz. Gr. neut. «κορμίον» kormíon < Classical deverbal masc. noun «κορμός» kŏrmós --> clump, trunk, human torso < Classical v. «κείρω» keírō --> to cut off hair, shave, mow off, cut down (PIE *(s)ker- to cut cf Hitt. karš- to cut off; Alb. shqerr, to tear apart; Lith. atskirti, to separate, discern).

    «Σβάρτσος» [ˈsvart͡sos] (masc.) < from Arnie's surname (Arnold Schwarzenegger).

    Decades ago, the strongman was either an «Ηρακλής» [iɾaˈklis] (masc.) --> Hercules, a «Μασίστας» [maˈsistas] (masc.) --> Maciste or a «Κουταλιανός» [kutaʎaˈnos] (masc.), a real person (Panagis Koutalianos) a man of Herculean power who lived in the middle of the 19th c.; he travelled Europe and North America as a weight lifter and wrestler, became a legend, and his name was synonymous with strongman in early-middle 20th c. Greece.
     

    rusita preciosa

    Modus forendi
    Russian (Moscow)
    Russian words come to mind:
    качок /katchok/ - from the verb качать (to rock/to pump), one who pumps weights
    мордоворот /mordovorot/ - from морда (slang for face) and воротить (to turn/skew/make uneven/ - face-breaker
    богатырь /bogatyr/ - a warrior from Russian folklore (many think that it comes from богатый/rich, but in has nothing to do with it, it comes from a Turkic honorific).

    I'd say, only the last one is positive.
     
    Last edited:

    Armas

    Senior Member
    Finnish
    Finnish

    kaappi = cabinet, closet, locker, cupboard
    patti = lump
    körmy, untranslatable
    köriläs, untranslatable

    The first two are slang, the last two colloquial.
     

    apmoy70

    Senior Member
    Greek
    my dictionary says "cormorant" < LAT.: corvus marinus
    The name of the bird is indeed a contraction of the two Latin words, but in slangy Greek, «κορμοράνος» (when referring to the strongman) derives from «κορμί»/«κορμός»
     

    Encolpius

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    Nice observation, thanks...I think we all would appreciate other's help and correction here....too bad, people do not care...we are here to learn not to chat :)
     

    ger4

    Senior Member
    German
    German: Schrank ('wardrobe', as in Dutch) or Bär ('bear'). Perhaps a Bär is a bit similar to the Czech 'thunder-beater': big and bulky, probably strong (even though that's just implied) but maybe rather clumsy and not necessarily a skilled fighter. - Apart from that, there is the Muskelprotz (Muskel = muscle, Protz < protzen = to show off) and the universal Macho (who might just pretend to be strong).
     

    SuperXW

    Senior Member
    1. literal
    強壯的男人
    2. fixed terms
    猛男(hunk)
    筋肉人(borrowed from Japanese I guess)
    肌肉男(muscle man)
    健美先生
    Mainland Chinese is a bit different to Taiwanese Chinese.
    Only 猛男, 肌肉男 are commonly used.
    Also, 壮男 "strong male".

    In addition, Chinese traditionally use 汉 to refer to a physical-worker male.
    So there are also:
    壮汉 "strong man"
    彪形大汉 idiom: "tiger-like big man".
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    The references to iron remind me of 'ijzervreter' in Dutch (iron-eater), but that refers to a person who is not really afraid. But of course those are strong in general.

    I also find references to 'klerenkast/ kleerkast' (clothes cupboard, lit., so like wardrobe), and mythological figures such as Hercules or fictitious characters such as 'Tarzan'. Not what you are looking for, I suppose...
    I thought of leeuw (lion) but that refers to bravery rather...
     

    bibax

    Senior Member
    Czech (Prague)
    There is a Czech word almara ("Schrank") but I think it is used only for strong women only
    Czech: almara f. (< Lat. armaria, wardrobe, шкаф) or kredenc f. (< Ger. Kredenz < credenza, cupboard, sideboard) is a huge, oversized woman (not too flattering);
     

    mataripis

    Senior Member
    Strong in Modern Tagalog is Malakas. Strong Man is Malakas na Tao.A very strong man is Napakalakas na Tao. The older form Kalakasan is still used in Southern Tagalog. A very strong Person in Southern Tagalog is Kalakas na Tao. ( physical and hidden powers and talents)
     
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