A voice which wore a beard

< Previous | Next >

James Brandon

Senior Member
English + French - UK
In "The Alexandria Quartet - Justine", Lawrence Durrell writes (page 56, Faber, 1961 ed.), of Melissa, a female character in the novel: "She now began to sob in a voice which wore a beard and [to] call for the police." [She is caught up in some brawl with drunken sailors.]

I am puzzled by the expression and wonder what is meant. Is it common? Does it mean she is crying (a hoarse voice), or that she is sounding masculine (a voice like that of a man)?

I have found very few references to this expression on the web, but maybe have not looked in the right places.

Comments welcome. Thanks.
 
  • ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Never heard of it, James. I would presume it meant 'in a deep, manly way', beards being the ultimate manly doodah.

    ~ewie, beard-wearer since way back in the last century:p
     

    James Brandon

    Senior Member
    English + French - UK
    I suppose your suggestion is the most plausible. I just wanted to check there may not be another meaning and that it was not a common expression: it sounds like the author made this one up, as it were...
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top