a week from Tuesday

cheshire

Senior Member
Japanese
It's Saturday. I've got tickets to the game a week from Tuesday.
What "Tuesday" does the speaker have in mind, the previous Tuesday or the next Tuesday? Or can't it be inferred from the above alone?
 
  • ireney

    Modistra
    Greek Greece Mod of Greek, CC and CD
    I 'd say next Tuesday. I would personally say (well not really :D) Tuesday last if I meant the previous one.
     

    elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Definitely the upcoming Tuesday.

    "A week from last Tuesday" is "next Tuesday"!
     

    GEmatt

    Senior Member
    English/BE, Français/CH, Deutsch/CH (rustier & rustier)
    Hi,
    I'd have said for the Tuesday after next, but now I'm having doubts... definitely not for the previous Tuesday, though.
    "I've got tickets for the game!"
    -"When is it?"
    "Last week."
    -" . . ."
    :)
     

    elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Well, obviously the game hasn't already happened. The question is whether the Tuesday the game will happen a week from is last Tuesday or next Tuesday.

    It's definitely next Tuesday, which means the game will take place in more than a week.

    If today is Sunday, the game will take place in 9 days (not in 2).
     

    ireney

    Modistra
    Greek Greece Mod of Greek, CC and CD
    We are all thoroughly confused (or only I am)

    As I read it the speaker has tickets from the Tuesday after next as Gemat said, having in mind next Tuesday. I hope that clears up what I meant
     

    elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Just to make things crystal clear:
    It's Saturday (November 18). I've got tickets to the game a week from Tuesday (November 28).
     

    GEmatt

    Senior Member
    English/BE, Français/CH, Deutsch/CH (rustier & rustier)
    Well, obviously the game hasn't already happened. The question is whether the Tuesday the game will happen a week from is last Tuesday or next Tuesday.

    It's definitely next Tuesday, which means the game will take place in more than a week.

    If today is Sunday, the game will take place in 9 days (not in 2).

    :thumbsup: thanks elroy - my doubts are dispelled. Of course, using the actual date is a good way of eliminating any confusion, too ;)
     

    Victoria32

    Senior Member
    English (UK) New Zealand
    It's Saturday. I've got tickets to the game a week from Tuesday.
    What "Tuesday" does the speaker have in mind, the previous Tuesday or the next Tuesday? Or can't it be inferred from the above alone?
    I would assume she means the Tuesday after th Tuesday coming - i.e., It's presently Saturday the 10th. Tuesday coming will be the 13th, and the Tuesday for which she is offering the tickets, is therefore the 20th.


    VL
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Rather like next Tuesday and this Tuesday, a week from Tuesday or a week on Tuesday, or Tuesday week (other variant) are unreliable in many contexts. There is no definite answer, and even if there were, there is no way to persuade the English-speaking world to adopt that answer consistently.

    You have a choice. Keep on living an exciting life of uncertainty, or avoid this usage unless you are absolutely certain how it will be understood.
    That does, of course, leave open much opportunity for mischief ... for example, inviting Bill to come to the party next Saturday and being all concerned that he shows up a week late because you knew he understood 2 December, and you knew you were having the party on 25 November.
     

    elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Panj, I understand that "next Tuesday" and "this Tuesday" can be ambiguous, but certainly "a week from Tuesday" can only mean "a week from the upcoming Tuesday"?
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Panj, I understand that "next Tuesday" and "this Tuesday" can be ambiguous, but certainly "a week from Tuesday" can only mean "a week from the upcoming Tuesday"?
    Why?
    If I said I'll see you a week from Tuesday, how do you know I'm not talking about a week from yesterday (which was a Tuesday).
     

    elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Why?
    If I said I'll see you a week from Tuesday, how do you know I'm not talking about a week from yesterday (which was a Tuesday).
    Because in that case I'd expect you to say "Tuesday" or "next Tuesday" or "this Tuesday."

    If you meant a week from yesterday, I would expect you to say "a week from last Tuesday" (or "yesterday" in this case, but let's say you said it tomorrow).

    To me, "a week from Tuesday" always refers to a future Tuesday.

    But maybe it's just me.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Because in that case I'd expect you to say "Tuesday" or "next Tuesday" or "this Tuesday."

    If you meant a week from yesterday, I would expect you to say "a week from last Tuesday" (or "yesterday" in this case, but let's say you said it tomorrow).

    To me, "a week from Tuesday" always refers to a future Tuesday.

    But maybe it's just me.
    - or maybe me:)
    I've not found consistency in these expressions so I distrust them.
    I wonder is there a difference ....

    You see that I mentioned two alternative expressions that are, I think, more common here.
    A week on Tuesday and Tuesday week are, perhaps, more likely to be misunderstood than a week from Tuesday?
    Alternatively, I could simply be confused by all of this.
     

    elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    A week on Tuesday and Tuesday week are, perhaps, more likely to be misunderstood than a week from Tuesday?
    Hmmm...

    I think for "a week on Tuesday" it depends on the verb.

    -How long have you been dating?
    -It was a week on Tuesday.
    (This means they started dating Tuesday Nov. 14, so it's been over a week.)

    Note: "Tuesday" is a bad example because today is Wednesday so you would just say "yesterday." But let's assume for the sake of argument that it's Thursday.

    -How long have you been dating?
    -It'll be a week on Tuesday.
    (This means they started dating Tuesday Nov. 21, so it's been less than a week.)

    Am I talking nonsense?

    I don't think I ever say "Tuesday week."
     

    Mafe Dongo

    Senior Member
    Spanish-Colombia
    Hmmm...
    Am I talking nonsense?
    I don't think so, Elryo.


    Panjandrum, thank you very much!!! You are always extremely helpful!!!, but I don't think it has to be that complicated". A little bit of common sense, and that's it.:eek:
     

    difficult cuss

    Senior Member
    English England
    There is a big misunderstanding amongst many mainland Europeans over the concept of "this ****day" and "next ****day". Especially if it is earlier in the week than the day mentioned (i.e. it is wednesday and the "next friday" is mentioned).
    When my Austrian, German of Dutch colleagues hear "next friday" they always take it to mean the friday which follows, not the one which will be beyond 6 days.
    I think that this is the weay to look at it. If you hear "next tuesday" (or any other day of course) from a UK English speaker it will mean the next tuesday which follows BUT not within the next six days.
     
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