A well-off family

Elsie!

Member
Chinese
If I was born in a well-off family, can I say”I come from a well-off family”? Is it idiomatic? And is there any other expression?
 
  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    If I was born into a well-off family, can I say ”I come from a well-off family”?
    Yes.
    Is it idiomatic?
    Yes, with the correction.
    And is there any other expression?
    I was born with a silver spoon in my mouth. <- idiom. This idiom is only used in certain contexts - it does not directly say that the family was wealthy - it suggests that the family was wealthy because your parents could afford the best things for you.
     
    Last edited:

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I come from a well off family - strikes me as not particularly idiomatic.

    I come from a family that's (quite) well off.
    I added "quite" to add a touch of modesty :).
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I think in American English I would use "well-to-do" to mean "rich". "Well-off" to mean "comfortably able to meet financial requirements with some money left over for luxuries."

    This link seems to agree with me: The adjectives well-off and well-to-do: Is there a fine difference between them?

    On the dictionary com. site, the adjective well-off is defined as "having sufficient money for a comfortable living; well-to-do".

    At the same time, the adjective well-to-do is defined there as "prosperous; rich" (without mentioning well-off). As for the synonyms of each (1, 2) of the two, although they are almost the same, but there's a slight difference in their relevance for the one or the other.
     
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