A wind of change has struck our offices?

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AumanC

Member
Dutch - Belgium (Flemish)
Hello

I'm looking for an idiomatic expression for a new wind, something new, translated from Dutch. This is the context:

A wind of change has struck our offices in [city]. Bringing 2 years of experience as a sales manager for [former company], [Name] is to be the new face of [company] in [country].

I tried translating that first sentence, but I'm not a native speaker myself. Googling the expression " a wind of change has struck" only resulted in 500 hits, so this probably isn't very common or understandable...

Would anyone know a better alternative?
 
Last edited:
  • dermott

    Senior Member
    B.E. via Australian English
    You would never see or hear the expression in this context. In fact, it's a cliche that most would try to avoid. There are any number of decent alternatives and it depends how informal you want to be. Or how far down the "bizspeak" road you want to travel. You could say, "We've made changes/We're making changes at our offices in [city]".
     

    joanvillafane

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    I completely agree with dermott's suggestions. Also, if you search for "winds of change" (in the plural) you'll probably get a lot more hits, but I still don't recommend it. Too much of a cliché as dermott said.
     

    AumanC

    Member
    Dutch - Belgium (Flemish)
    Thank you for your quick replies! But somehow it feels as if part of the original message is lost if I simply write "we're making changes at our offices in [city]"... This particular sentence would be the opening of an article, and in Dutch, the new wind expression is used more in relation to new people joining an office (or maybe even new leaders) rather than changing things up.

    Does this make sense? :p
     

    joanvillafane

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    Well, it makes sense but it doesn't sound natural in English. We do speak of people bringing "a breath of fresh air" into an environment, but honestly, for a formal written article in a business context, I would avoid that also.
    Is the person in your article expected to create major changes in the company? Is that why you want to emphasize "change" in the opening sentence?
     

    AumanC

    Member
    Dutch - Belgium (Flemish)
    I wouldn't necessarily call it that formal to be honest, it's a blog article and the company intentionally chooses not to be too formal in its communication.

    To answer your second question, yes he's supposed to head the offices in that particular country, so I guess you could say he's expected to bring major changes to the company.

    The article is actually just a summary of what he did in his former position followed by quotes on what factors helped him decide to make the switch (the strengths and opportunities he sees). We also explain that we're happy to have him join our team.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    'When the winds of change blow, some build walls and some build windmills'.
    Apart from being a miserable cliche, it suggests there was a great deal that seriously needed changing.
     

    AumanC

    Member
    Dutch - Belgium (Flemish)
    Never heard that one before, I really like that expression :D But I'm not sure it really links to the second sentence and the rest of the text, and I guess you're implying miserable cliches should be avoided... Also I wouldn't really say that needed serious changing, as that implies that some things were really not going well, no?

    But I definitely have to remember that one :p Thanks for your help everyone!
     
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