a <windy><draughty> old cottage

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Shandol

Senior Member
Persian
The following example has been chosen from" English Collocation In Use" book.

My brother and his wife live in a windy old cottage.

According to the book, the sentence is wrong and the student should correct the collocation error "windy old cottage" and instead of that write "draughty old cottage". I don't know why "windy" doesn't work here. What do you think about it?
Thanks!
 
  • The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I agree with Uncle Jack that "draughty" makes more sense. It would not be out of the question to use "windy" to refer to a house, as in the quotation below from 1906:

    For about Donald, as about his mistress, there was that air of resolution, gloved by courtesy, which had baffled Hurst since his first coming to this windy house upon the moor.

    But the implication there is that the house is situated in a windswept location, not that it is draughty inside.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Note that in American English, it's spelled "drafty".
    (An American not familiar with British spelling might think "draughty" is a new word pronounced "draw-ty.")
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    (An American not familiar with British spelling might think "draughty" is a new word pronounced "draw-ty.")
    I laugh at that suggestion! :D
    I agree with Uncle Jack that "draughty" makes more sense. It would not be out of the question to use "windy" to refer to a house, as in the quotation below from 1906:

    For about Donald, as about his mistress, there was that air of resolution, gloved by courtesy, which had baffled Hurst since his first coming to this windy house upon the moor.

    But the implication there is that the house is situated in a windswept location, not that it is draughty inside.
    That is how I would read it, too, although I suspect it is draughty inside, for the person to have mentioned the wind.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Note that in American English, it's spelled "drafty".
    (An American not familiar with British spelling might think "draughty" is a new word pronounced "draw-ty.")
    I would not. I would think of a "draught horse" like a Clydesdale and that is pronounced "draft", but spelled "draught". But a lot of people would assume the wrong pronunciation.

     
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