a woman and a baby / a woman with a baby

sunnyweather

Senior Member
Polish
I wonder if the sentence says what I want it to say. I mean there was a woman whose baby was near her and a man in a supermarket let them be served first at the till. Which sentence illiustrates the situation better?

'A man stepped back to make way for a woman with a baby.'

A man stepped back to make way for a woman and a baby.

Thank you.
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I would use "with a baby," which serves as a reason for letting her go ahead. A "woman and a baby" will be read as two individuals, not so tightly connected as a "woman with a baby."
     

    sunnyweather

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Thank you very much indeed. How about this sentence then?

    'A man helped a woman with a pram get off the bus.'

    I guess it's OK.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Re post 4 Yes, the "pram" sentence is fine - and you definitely couldn't use "and" in it. That would imply that the man did two things: he helped a woman get off the bus, and he also helped a pram get off the bus....
     
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