a yield of pleasure of another sort but none the less...

wait there

Senior Member
Korean-English
Freud on the couch

The child takes control. At the same time, a form
of revenge against the absent mother can be entertained in the
form the play takes. The child is ‘able to repeat his unpleasant
experience in play because the repetition carried along with it a
yield of pleasure of another sort but none the less a direct one.


Hi

I guess that after "because", there must be subjective and verb but I'm confused which one will be the verb.

Maybe "sort" can be the verb? If it is the case, then what's the meaning of the phrase?



Many Thanks as always
 
  • suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Looking at the whole of this sentence it means:
    (Assuming that the kid is playing some sort of game) he might act out some of the nasty things that have happened to him. This is the repetition, repeating the nasty stuff in a different form. The new form is "play" so he gets some pleasure from it. The pleasure is a different sort of pleasure, but it is directly related to the original nasty experience.

    The because is a means of explaining why a kid might appear to repeat something which was nasty the first time round. Because it is play it gives pleasure, even though the theme is nasty.

    Sort is not the verb there, it is definitely a noun in this context.

    I hope this helps, let us know if you need more clarification.
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I see no need for any talk of subjunctives.

    The passage is made more difficult, WT, by your failure to give the correct form of the main verb - the original has The child may, after all, only have been able to repeat his unpleasant experience in play because...

    Freud is saying that this experience, the temporary departure of the child's mother, can only be re-enacted by the child as a game - throwing away the wooden reel - because the game brings him pleasure of a particular kind (sort). This pleasure seems to derive from the mastery of the reel shown in the game.

    This is a different sort of pleasure to that suggested in the previous paragraph - throwing it away brings the joy of getting it back - but the feeling of mastery is nevertheless a direct pleasure like the one explained previously.

    ps. cross-posted with Suzi, with whom I agree, except in our interpretation of the relationship of the original experience (the departure of the mother) and the two interpretations of the pleasure of the re-enactment: 1. the joy of return, and 2. the feeling of mastery.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    I do not know why you say we disagree, Thomas. I was not aware I'd even expressed an opinion on the matters you raise there!

    I do not have the original text, and you do, so your reading is informed by more background than mine. My gloss is aimed at giving a rough indication of the relationships in the language elements, as the OP posted them .. I was not decoding Freudian meaning. I leave that to others, for sure.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    I'm sorry I said we disagreed, Suzi. That doesn't happen often.

    I'm happy that you think I'm on the right lines.:)
    No worries. Seeing that the OP altered the grammar for his post in here means that you were already set to read it slightly differently, I reckon.
    :)
     

    wait there

    Senior Member
    Korean-English
    Oh the book "Freud on the couch" has only the shortend sentences in the original text. And now I can see the full one that might have been used in many books, which seems more clear as you mentioned. Thanks a lot.
     
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