Aardvark

Little One

Senior Member
England. English
What is the Italian for aardvark? I know what the word for anteater is - formichiere, but I cannot find the word for aardvark. They are not one and the same.

Also while I'm on the subject of strange animals, what is the Italian for duckbilled platypus?
 
  • Elisa68

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Aardvark---->Oritteropo (I swear I didn't know):D or Formichiere africano
    Duckbilled platypus--------> Ornitorinco
     

    Idioteque

    Senior Member
    Italy - Italian
    Little One said:
    What is the Italian for aardvark? I know what the word for anteater is - formichiere, but I cannot find the word for aardvark. They are not one and the same.

    Also while I'm on the subject of strange animals, what is the Italian for duckbilled platypus?
    hello littleone,
    since Charles hasn't shown up yet :D, this is what I found on my dictionary (not farina del mio sacco again :rolleyes: )

    aardvark= "oritteropo" (Orycteropus afer), term of African origin which literally means "groundpig" (hope I translated correctly "maiale di terra" :eek: )
    duckbilled platypus=ornitorinco

    EDIT: sorry Elisa, I was too slow! :p Anyway, neither I had ever heard about oritteropo! :D
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    carrickp said:
    Hang on -- Charles will be here with an answer as soon as he wakes up (it's still last Tuesday or something like that in Australia).
    Parlando del diavolo.............!
    Don't be cheeky carrickp! We are actually ahead of you in time well over ten hours depending on what part of the States you live in.
    Ornitorinco is the Italian word for platypus. I think it was Winnie who asked this question recently. I'll take Laura's and Eliza's word for the other two. :)
     

    DAH

    Senior Member
    USA/California--English
    aardvark= "oritteropo" (Orycteropus afer), term of African origin, but

    Zoological words are derived from Greek. There is the Greek word for the species. Then, there is the stem, if you will, e.g., "afer" that indicates the physical origin of the species--I believe this is the methodology.:idea:
     
    Charles Costante said:
    Parlando del diavolo.............!
    Don't be cheeky carrickp! We are actually ahead of you in time well over ten hours depending on what part of the States you live in.
    Ornitorinco is the Italian word for platypus. I think it was Winnie who asked this question recently. I'll take Laura's and Eliza's word for the other two. :)
    At the time of year I was in Australia it actually was 11 hours. Funny -- it just seemed like regular old time and regular old days, even though it was some other day and everything actually was upside down and all. And no one uses salt.
     

    ElaineG

    Senior Member
    USA/English
    What Charles doesn't like to share is that it's actually a wholly different year there, I think 2009, but Charles, being upside down, is aging backwards so that he's only 73 at the moment.

    But getting back to oritteropi, I never realized-- until this thread caused me to look it up -- that there is only one species of platypus and that the designation duck-billed is superfluous. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Platypus .
     

    Tommaso Gastaldi

    Senior Member
    Italian, ITALY
    Is the Platypus a typical australian animal? I think I have seen it only on some cartoon: "64 ZOO LANE", I think, which perhaps comes from there.

    I have heard the word oritteropo but I have seen the animals only as a photo on the encyclopedia. We in Italy don't have so many wild animals as you have in Australia (or in Africa and USA).

    Actually, Australia has a lot of very strange animals that can be seen only there.

    Once I watched a documentary on a terrible specie of jelly fish that are found in Australia. They are really nasty. Can kill you in a few seconds...
     
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