abandon her child by abortion

Sun14

Senior Member
Chinese
Hello, my friends,

I was wondering whether the underlined part is idiomatic:

"A woman wants to abandon her child by abortion."

Thoughts and context: A woman doesn't want to have the baby so she chooses to abort him or her.
 
  • boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    No, a woman wants to have an abortion and you'd better not mention the child because it becomes a political issue. According to the Church this amounts to murder and things get complicated. One thing is for sure - this is not 'abandoning' the child, because the child never comes into this world...
     

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    No, a woman wants to have an abortion and you'd better not mention the child because it becomes a political issue. According to the Church this amounts to murder and things get complicated. One thing is for sure - this is not 'abandoning' the child, because the child never comes into this world...
    I was wondering whether abandon could be used metaphorically. My student wants to make up a story by with the words abandon and abortion. You can just take it as a practice of words.
     

    Kirill V.

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I was wondering whether abandon could be used metaphorically. My student wants to make up a story by with the words abandon and abortion. You can just take it as a practice of words.
    After a row, the woman decided to abandon her husband and have an abortion

    Still a sad story though
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I can't see any reason at all why a child can't be mentioned in a story or essay about abortion. In fact it might be rather odd not to mention a child!
    Of course people have their personal beliefs, but nobody's forcing abortion on them. In the UK we haven't been limited to one child per family and elective abortion is legal and available. It is not a party political issue

    But to talk about 'abandoning' the unborn child is not an meaningful use of 'abandon'.
    It sounds as if the student needs examples of the meaning of 'abandon'.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Maybe the student means "get rid of the foetus" - but that's the sort of language someone who doesn't approve of abortion would use. I don't know a polite or neutral way to say "get rid of". Women just talk about "having an abortion", generally.
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    I can't see any reason at all why a child can't be mentioned in a story or essay about abortion. In fact it might be rather odd not to mention a child!
    No, no language reason why it cannot be mentioned later in the story. However, the particular sentence does not necessitate it once the word 'abortion' is mentioned. And it is common sense that in an international forum this could become a sensitive issue, as there may be people that feel strongly on the subject. Nothing more than that - all of this is perfectly acceptable in my country and culture...
     
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