abbracciare con lo sguardo maggiore orizzonte

Queen Elizabeth

Senior Member
Italian
"si alzò bruscamente in piedi, come se volesse abbracciare con lo sguardo maggiore orizzonte."

is this correct?

"he suddenly jumped on his feet as if he wanted to embrace more horizon with his sight"

Thank you!
 
  • elfa

    Senior Member
    English
    "he suddenly jumped on his feet as if he wanted to embrace more horizon with his sight"
    No, this really doesn't sound good - sorry!

    This is very difficult, as there is no equivalent in English. I've tried with the following - see whether it might go in here (or if anybody else has any better ideas :p)

    "he suddenly jumped to his feet as if, by scanning the sweep of the horizon, he was embracing it."
     

    rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    Embrace more horizon sounds very strange. Does it in Italian? ALso the expression to jump to one's feet not on. A suggestion might be
    He suddenly leaped to his feet as if he wanted to take in all of the horizon at once.
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    Yes, I thought of that too - but I guess it depends how much of the element of the 'embrace' Queen Elizabeth wants to convey.
    Elfa, ...................... as if to embrace the horizon sounds OK in English, but ......................as if to embrace more of the horizon (which is what the Italian sentence implies) doesn't really work for me. :)
     

    occhibelli

    Senior Member
    English
    We do talk about searching for "broader horizons" in English, so you might render this as, "as if he wanted his eyes to take in a broader horizon."
     

    occhibelli

    Senior Member
    English
    Nit-picking maybe, but I tend to think of 'broader horizon' as metaphorical rather than actual. :)
    I think that "maggiore orizzonte" is metaphorical by its very nature, and that the word "horizon" almost inevitably suggests something that transcends landscape.
     

    elfa

    Senior Member
    English
    I think that "maggiore orizzonte" is metaphorical by its very nature, and that the word "horizon" almost inevitably suggests something that transcends landscape.
    I am assuming this is from Il Corsaro (which Queen Elisabeth has asked for help with previously) and therefore the person that leaps to his feet was on a boat and the horizon in question a vista out to sea. I guess we should wait and see what is meant by it, and which version best fits QE's purpose. :)
     

    GavinW

    Senior Member
    British English
    I think the sentence sounds most odd in Italian. Hence, perhaps, the difficulty in translating it. Altogether: a bit weird. That's my verdict....

    What say you native Italian speakers?

    EDIT: I refer, of course, to "maggiore orizzonte" used in the singular, with no article or.... anything.
     

    Queen Elizabeth

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Thank you everybody. I also find this sentence very difficult and a bit weird!
    The meaning of "maggiore orizzonte" is not metaphorical, the man stands up in order to see a "bigger horizon" (sorry I don't know how to say it in a better way). I mean: if you watch the same landscape from a taller point of observation, the line of the horizon becomes longer; so he stands up (before he was lying down in a rowboat) to be able to see "a bigger horizon".
    This is what I need to express...I hope I made myself a bit clearer. :)
     

    NewYorktoLA

    Senior Member
    English-the variety known as AE
    Given that "maggiore orizzonte" is indeed literal, what about:
    ...as if he wanted to take in a greater expanse of the horizon....
     

    Girino

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    ...as if he needed to see more of the horizon.
    ...as if he needed to take in more of the horizon. (emphasis on comprehending what he sees)
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top