abbreviate and abate

Invisible man

Member
Vietnamese
1. abbreviate.
She would abbreviate her bread to small ones.
2. Abate
He abated a new policy very intensively

Did anybody give me comment into 2 sentences.
 
  • arundhati

    Senior Member
    French - France
    Hello,
    You can't use "abbreviate" for an object, you can use it for a word for example, you could abbreviate "government" as "gvt".
    I can't figure out what you wanted to say in your second sentence, could you rephrase, please?
     

    tunaafi

    Senior Member
    English - British (Southern England)
    Still wrong, I'm afraid. Lookup the words in a dictionary, and pay attention not only to the definitions, but to the example sentence provided...
     

    jimreilly

    Senior Member
    American English
    Are you trying to say that she summarized the regulations and law in a concise form? or that she just printed the first part and left out later details? or something else entirely? And "abate" is usually used in a different way; you don't usually abate something, it abates.....like "the crime wave abated" (the number of crimes went down) or the "the rain abated" (it stopped raining so hard), etc. In certain legal matters you can abate something, such as a law or a tax, but this is a somewhat specialized usage and I don't see how it would work here. The patient might fill out that survey, or throw it away without filling it out, or stop filling it out before it was done, or any number of other things, but the patient wouldn't "abate" it. Hope this helps!
     

    Invisible man

    Member
    Vietnamese
    1. The physician abbreviated the prescription to shorten the side effect.
    2. The hospital abated the crowed- ER department by building satellite clinic s
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    My guesses as to what those sentences might mean. In both cases, it seems to be about reducing something…

    1. The physician abbreviated the prescription to shorten the side effect.
    The doctor reduced a patient’s dosage of a certain medication to lower the risk of adverse side-effects

    2. The hospital abated the crowed- ER department by building satellite clinics
    The hospital reduced the pressure on its overstretched ER department by setting up satellite clinics.
     

    jimreilly

    Senior Member
    American English
    My guesses as to what those sentences might mean. In both cases, it seems to be about reducing something…

    1. The physician abbreviated the prescription to shorten the side effect.
    The doctor reduced a patient’s dosage of a certain medication to lower the risk of adverse side-effects

    2. The hospital abated the crowed- ER department by building satellite clinics
    The hospital reduced the pressure on its overstretched ER department by setting up satellite clinics.
    I think you've got it, lingobingo--and this is an excellent example of how what seem like small shades of meaning or usage can make a big difference, one of the things that make languages so fascinating and also so frustrating!
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top