aber heute schon

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lollo123

Senior Member
German
hi

i^d like to know how I can translate the german word schon into english .
I don^t mean already !
ex .:
Ich esse keine Schokolade , aber heute schon.

Ich finde schon , dass du gewachsen bist .

I am not even sure if the word has a different meaning in the two sentences ...:confused:
 
  • Hutschi

    Senior Member
    You can change the sentence:
    Usually I do not eat chokolade but today.

    "Schon" emphasizes that it is an exception.

    May be there is a literal translation.
    You can omit either aber or schon without changing the sense.

    In the second sentence, you emphasize that it is indeed true.

    I think indeed that you have grown.

    In the first sentence it emphasizes the negative part, in the second it strengthens the positive one.

    Do you have any context for fine tuning the proposals? Without context there may be additional connotations, but they are difficult to explain.
     

    manfy

    Senior Member
    German - Austria
    I am not even sure if the word has a different meaning in the two sentences ...:confused:
    Nein, hat es nicht.
    In both sentences it acts as an emphasizer for the opposite of the negation. It makes the statement empathic. (actually 'doch and schon' are the expressed antonyms of 'nicht' in your sentences).
    In English you usually use the auxiliary 'do' to create that effect.

    "Ich esse keine Schokolade, aber heute schon." -> [Normally] I don't eat chocolate, but today I do.

    "[Egal was die anderen sagen, ] Ich finde schon, dass du gewachsen bist." -> [Contrary to what the others just said, ] I do think that you've grown.

    The use of 'schon' in your second sentence automatically implies that somebody else is thinking otherwise, i.e. 'schon' is emphasizing the contrast to the implied and opposing 'not grown' opinion. In English you might need to play with the surrounding context to point the reader in the same direction as the German version does.

    cross-posted with Hutschi -- I think we might be saying the same thing ... just in very different ways ;)
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    In this case, please consider that "schon" is very context sensitive.
    The simple sentence "Ich weiß das schon" may as well mean "I know this already" as ""I know this indeed/I know this, indeed I do)." (Emphasizing the negative of "Ich weiß das nicht.") It depends in spoken language very much on intonation what is meant. Mostly the first, but take care.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Usually I do not eat chocolate but today. :cross:
    Dieser Satz ist falsch.
    I indeed think that you have grown.
    So rum ist der Satz grammatisch richtig, aber unidiomatisch.
    In both sentences it acts as an emphasizer for the opposite of the negation. It makes the statement empathic.
    I don't think there's any emphasis in the first sentence. It's just a contrast. Is there any emphasis in "Mein Hemd ist weiß, aber deins ist schwarz"? I don't see the difference.
    [Normally] I don't eat chocolate, but today I do. :cross:
    I don't normally eat chocolate, but today I am.
    I do think that you've grown. :tick:
    Hier funktioniert "do".
     
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