Abide with / by something vs put up

valdemar

Senior Member
Español mexicano
Would you please help me understand the meaning of this constructions by using "abide"? Esencially I understand "abide" like having the meaning close to "live" or "remain" since it is related with the noun "abode". Then "You have to abide by the law" would mean something like " you have to live under the law". And "you have to abide with him" would mean "you have to live with him" (of course not in the sence of living in the same house but always having some conection, or something like that). Now, none of these perceptions fit with this other context, or at least I cannot understand its meaning:"...I wouldn’t normally have an issue with Superman. But I can’t abide with him taking jobs that hard working American super heroes could do. Spiderman and Batman have families they need to support and giving handouts to illegal superheroes doesn’t help them. "
 
  • valdemar

    Senior Member
    Español mexicano
    I can't abide him taking jobs....... 'abide' here means 'I can't bear/stand.

    The WR dictionary has various definitions of 'abide' which should help you.
    http://www.wordreference.com/definition/abide

    Bevj, thanks you for your reply. I didn't think that was the sense because,accordingly, using "abide" in the sense of "tolerate", "bear", or "stand" like in "I can't abide him" would sound unfashioned. So, now I have this doubt, in what cases apart from the phrasal verb "abide by" would this word sound naturally, specially in speaking? Is the form "I can't abide with him taking..." more natural than " I can't abide him taking..."?.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    valdemar.

    "...I wouldn’t normally have an issue with Superman. But I can’t abide with him taking jobs that hard working American super heroes could do. Spiderman and Batman have families they need to support and giving handouts to illegal superheroes doesn’t help them. "
    What is the source of this text?

    "... I can't abide with him taking ..." in this case is ungrammatical and it should be "... I can't abide him taking..."

    I can't abide with him (meaning I can't live with him) is an intransitive (and archaic) use of abide.
     

    valdemar

    Senior Member
    Español mexicano
    Thanks for your answer AndyC
    What is the source of this text?
    This is the source: http://www.myspace.com/lawdog1527/blog/513022167

    As Andy says, 'abide', 'abide by' and 'abide with' have different meanings.
    Now I'm not sure about anything about the use of abide. Even worse I don't know if I can use it now or not because it might sound 'archaic'. You may say I'm crazy but "I like how this word sounds", and I really want to learn how to use it properly. So now I have some contexts, please you all tell me if I'm wrong or if this use is 'archaic' and what word should I use instead:


    - I can't abide the way she's always looking at me.
    - I can't abide living this way. I need to find a real job.
    - I'm not agree with the results in the president election, I just can abide with the preference of the majority.
    - This woman had to abide always by what his father says
    - Just let God abide in you and your prosperity will come
    - The instructions of the pesticide manufaturer must be abided with when using extra activated charcoal filter
     

    Tazzler

    Senior Member
    American English
    Using "abide" in the sense of "tolerate" sounds very old-fashioned to me, almost biblical. Note that in the last sentence there should be a "by" after "abided."
     
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