ability to produce or to respond/ability to respond

Dahkraf

Member
Azerbaijani-Azerbaijan
Hi,
Just came across a sentence in an SAT passage that read "In people with Type 2 diabetes,the body has lost either the ability to produce enough insulin or the ability to respond to the insulin that is produced"
I argued that "the ability" in the second part of the sentence may be dropped without changing the meaning of the sentence.My tutor,however,insisted that making the change would make the sentence somewhat illogical.
I'd like to know whether this is the case.
Thanks in advance.
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Repeating "ability" seems helpful and advisable to me, Dahkraf. I see no point in arguing against using "ability" twice in that SAT passage.

    A reader might remember that "ability" refers to two different things, but there is no real advantage in dropping the second instance of "ability" in that sentence. If you do, you only increase the possibility that your reader will misunderstand what you are trying to express.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I agree with the tutor. The problem comes from the use of "either". I think that to have one "ability" the sentence would need to be rewritten.
    "In people with Type 2 diabetes, the body has lost the ability either to produce enough insulin or to respond to the insulin that is produced"
    or
    "In people with Type 2 diabetes, the body has lost the ability to produce enough insulin or to respond to the insulin that is produced"
    or
     
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