ablaze vs blazing, alight vs lit

pedrosacosta

Member
Portuguese
Hi,

What's the difference between these words?

ablaze/blazing
alight/lit


When ablaze/blazing or alight/lit terms should be used?

Thanks,
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    "Ablaze" and "alight" sound literary and would be somewhat unusual in everyday speech. If you have any sentences to provide for context, people could give you a decent opinion about how those words might sound in some real language.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    There is a thread covering this but it's hard to find :( I'll keep a-lookin' :D
    It is a prefix used in things like awake, aloud etc.
    Concise Oxford English Dictionary © 2008 Oxford University Press:
    a-2
    prefix
    • 1 to; towards: aside.

    • 2 in the process of: a-hunting. ■ in a specified state: aflutter.


    – origin OE, unstressed form of on.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Not a thread but a better description from Dictionary.com
    a reduced form of the Old English preposition on, meaning “on,” “in,” “into,” “to,” “toward,” preserved before a noun in a prepositional phrase, forming a predicate adjective or an adverbial element ( afoot; abed; ashore; aside; away ), or before an adjective ( afar; aloud; alow ), as a moribund prefix with a verb ( acknowledge ), and in archaic and dialectal use before a present participle in -ing ( set the bells aringing ); and added to a verb stem with the force of a present participle ( ablaze; agape; aglow; astride; and originally, awry ).
     

    Nymeria

    Senior Member
    English - Barbadian/British/educated in US universities blend
    In my opinion, they are almost identical in meaning. Ablaze and alight just sound more poetic and fancy. I would use them in regular conversation but perhaps that's because I've got a whimsical streak. :)
     
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