aboard her starship

aesir

Banned
Russian
Hello, this is the Opening Crawl of Star Wars: Episode IV – A New Hope:

"During the battle, Rebel spies managed to steal secret plans to the Empire's ultimate weapon, the DEATH STAR, an armored space station with enough power to destroy an entire planet. Pursued by the Empire's sinister agents, Princess Leia races home aboard her starship, custodian of the stolen plans that can save her people and restore freedom to the galaxy...."

Does "aboard" here mean she Princess Leia goes home "by taking" her starship? Thank you!
 
  • Sort of, yes, but to take a bus or train, or ship merely tells us the type of transportation being used, while "aboard X transportation vehicle" tells us that the person is presently inside the transportation, so there is a difference. One tells us means, the second location.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    "Aboard" means the same as "on board". They both mean "physically inside the vehicle", while "taking" means "using".

    Traditionally, in a train station, the last call before the train started moving was "All aboard!" meaning "everyone get on board the train". I don't know if this is still said.

    (cross-posted: I'm saying the same as Dale)
     

    Jimbob_Disco

    Senior Member
    British English
    Hello, this is the Opening Crawl of Star Wars: Episode IV – A New Hope:

    "During the battle, Rebel spies managed to steal secret plans to the Empire's ultimate weapon, the DEATH STAR, an armored space station with enough power to destroy an entire planet. Pursued by the Empire's sinister agents, Princess Leia races home aboard her starship, custodian of the stolen plans that can save her people and restore freedom to the galaxy...."

    Does "aboard" here mean she Princess Leia goes home "by taking" her starship? Thank you!
    It just means ‘on’ or ‘by means of’.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Aboard is a preposition and her starship is a noun phrase. When combined [prep. + n.] = adverbial/adjectival qualifier. (Here it is an adverbial qualifier - it tells us how she "raced")
     
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