aboard

mimi2

Senior Member
vietnam vietnamese
I think "aboard" but others think "ashore". Please tell me who is correct.
"The passengers were hurrying to get aboard/ashore because the ship was leaving in 15 minutes."
Thanks.
 
  • ireney

    Modistra
    Greek Greece Mod of Greek, CC and CD
    Aboard is when you get on a ship
    Ashore is when ou get off a ship in this context
     

    Joelline

    Senior Member
    American English
    "The passengers were hurrying to get aboard/ashore because the ship was leaving in 15 minutes."

    Both sentences can be correct. It really depends on where the passengers are and what they want to do!

    If the passengers are on the shore but want to get on the ship before it leaves, then this is correct: "The passengers were hurrying to get aboard because the ship was leaving in 15 minutes."

    But if the passengers are on the ship and want to get off the ship before it leaves, then this is correct: "The passengers were hurrying to get ashore because the ship was leaving in 15 minutes."
     

    mimi2

    Senior Member
    vietnam vietnamese
    But the problem is that I have only to choose either one or another. What do you think Joelline?
     

    Joelline

    Senior Member
    American English
    If this is an isolated sentence, I don't know what to suggest, miimi2! If the sentence is in a context, the context will tell you which one to choose. You really cannot answer the question unless you know where the passengers are (on the shore or the boat) and what they want to do (get to the shore or get on the boat)!

    If you have absolutely no context, then I'd say StrangeAttitude's answer is the right one: many native speakers would assume that you were trying to get aboard before the ship before it left. This was also your first choice! So, that's what I'd go with.
     

    mimi2

    Senior Member
    vietnam vietnamese
    Thanks StrangeAttitude, ireney and joelline a lot.
    I have appreciated all your help.
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    In the old days of fancy-schmancy cruise liners, the call would go out shortly before the ship made way "All ashore whose going ashore". This was a signal for non-passengers to leave… well-wishers or personal staff.

    If the ship is leaving in 15 minutes then I would dare to suggest that there isn't enough time to leave the ship, do anything worthwhile and get back aboard.
    As you must choose one, I'd go with 'aboard' as it is more likely to be correct.
     
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