aboard

19maximum97

New Member
Russian
Hello all.
I interest by nuances of use the word «aboard». Can I write, for example: «Welcome aboard train from London to Penzance.», «I was aboard bus which departed from bus station from Penzance to Land’s End»?
I know that it word using for welcome passengers in a plane or a ship.
 
  • heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Welcome aboard the WordReference Express. :)

    'Welcome aboard' is more or less a set expression used on trains, boats and planes, but it sounds rather formal and stilted in your second sentence. We would naturally say 'I was on the bus . . . '.

    Note that it should be ' . . . the train' and ' . . . the bus' and ' . . . the bus station.'.
     

    Szkot

    Senior Member
    UK English
    You can also see or hear on board the bus/train - 'There are [sic] a range of facilities available on board our trains'.

    There are numerous threads on the use of 'aboard'.
     
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