abode or dwelling

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VINDINAR

Member
colombian spanish
por favor en qué casos se usa abode, y en qué casos se usa dwelling? is there any difference?, siempre encuentro que la primera traducción para "morada" es dwelling, pero no veo mucho uso de esa palabra... es lo mismo decir: This is my dwelling or this is my abode.... o se usan en contextos diferentes? thanks.
 
  • Iris8

    Senior Member
    English - Ireland
    I don't think there's any big difference between them, but if I had to translate 'morada' into English, I would certainly go with 'abode'. And if I had to choose between 'this is my dwelling' or 'this is my abode' I would go with 'this is my abode'. For me, 'dwelling' is a little bit more vague than 'abode' - 'abode' is closer to 'home' for me, as you know I'm sure, 'abode' is very formal. I hope this helps :)
     
    They are similar but I don't think I've ever used either word in conversation. I've heard "cave dwelling" used to describe a cave use as a place to live. I think I've heard abode used to refer to a personal living space. I'd go with "This is where I/you/they live"
     

    SydLexia

    Senior Member
    UK English
    I would say that in the UK "abode" is archaic and usually only found in the phrase "of no fixed abode" (sin domicilio fijo?) and in HM Government documents about visas, residence, and immigration (cf. "right of abode"). It is fairly common, however, in the names of organisations involved in housing and accommodation.

    "dwelling" is also a fairly formal word and is often used where 'house' is not sufficiently precise (if a house contains a non-self-contained flat it will count as two dwellings for local taxation purposes - but possibly not from the point of view of prospective tenants).

    I don't think I would ever describe my house as my 'dwelling' but I might call it my '(humble) abode' in a jokey way (see Google here).

    The verb 'to abide' is used in phrases like "I can't abide/stand/bear his presence" and in the hymn "Abide with me" (Since 1927, the first and last verses of the hymn are traditionally sung at the FA Cup Final before the kick-off of the match, at around 2.45pm BST..........[also] sung prior to the kick-off at every Rugby League Challenge Cup final since 1929, the first final to be held at Wembley Stadium - source Wikipedia).

    Edit: The religious context makes all the difference. I suppose I could have guessed it and saved myself some time...


    syd
     
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    VINDINAR

    Member
    colombian spanish
    Thanks iris 8, Thanks D45, my question is about some prayers i'm translating and i've found sentences like: Tu morada celestial... Recibe en tu morada esta alabanza... entonces me pregunto cuál queda mejor? Your Heavenly dwelling/abode/house? Receive in your dwelling my praise? thanks for your help.
     
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    VINDINAR

    Member
    colombian spanish
    Sidlexia, thanks a lot for your help, ít´s very important for me to know the real use of these words nowadays, i would like to know the better way to translate some religious texts in which the word "MORADA" is often used. How would you talk about the place where God dwell? thanks a lot.
     

    VINDINAR

    Member
    colombian spanish
    Edit: The religious context makes all the difference. I suppose I could have guessed it and saved myself some time...


    syd[/QUOTE]


    SORRY:(
     
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