aborted the take-off 25 seconds into his time allocation

meedherrero

Senior Member
French-Spanish
Hi,

I have to translate this part, and I am not sure to understand what the highlighted part means. It is a questionnary about visually impaired athlete and their participation in the paralympics. Here it is about a track event,

Describe what would happen if an athlete in Class T11 aborted the take-off twenty-five seconds into his time allocation because he had run off-course in his approach

a) The athlete will be allowed to re-orientate and make the attempt again
b) The clock will be stopped and reset, the athlete will be allowed to re-orientate and start again
c)

aborted the take-off: he misses his start ?
twenty-five seconds into his time allocation: he has a time allocation but he runns off-course (not running in the right direction) during 25 seconds...???

Thanks!!
 
Last edited:
  • Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    "Take-off" in an athletic context refers to the run that comes before a jump, or to the first part of the jump at the end of the run.

    Athletes are given a certain amount of time to complete their jump. That is their time allocation.

    In this case, the athlete decided not to complete the jump because he had run off-course. (He probably just stopped running at that point and walked back to the starting line.) An athlete with good vision would not run off the course, but an athlete with impaired vision might. He made this decision before the end of his time allocation, but after 25 seconds had elapsed.

    I assume this is written in British English, by the way. In American English, re-orientate in answer (a) would be an error. We would use re-orient.
     

    seap

    New Member
    English
    Hi there,

    In this case, I would interpret "aborted the take-off" as most nearly meaning that the athlete started the take off BUT he had to stop "because he had run off-course in his approach". He didn't actually miss the start. In fact, he started normally (he just didn't finish) To abort a task you must have already started it.

    As for "twenty-five seconds into his allocation" I would say that you're on the right track. The athlete started a task and, after 25 seconds, decided not to follow through with it. When we say that we were an amount of time "into something" we are talking about a realization that occurred after a task had been started.

    EX: I didn't realize that I needed a pen until we were already 25 minutes into the test.
     

    seap

    New Member
    English
    Just to clarify: "take-off" implies that the athlete will be airborne. So "take-off' does not refer to running a race; it refers to the moments leading up to the athlete's jump.

    EX. 30 seconds into the take-off for the high jump, I realized that my shoe was untied.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Just to clarify: "take-off" implies that the athlete will be airborne. So "take-off' does not refer to running a race; it refers to the moments leading up to the athlete's jump.

    EX. 30 seconds into the take-off for the high jump, I realized that my shoe was untied.
    I've yet to see anybody take 30 seconds to get from the beginning of his run to launching over the bar. The text refers to the time allocation. That is, as already said (post #2), the time period within which the athlete must complete his attempt at the event (high jump, long jump, whatever). It's not about aborting a take-off run after running for 25 seconds.
     

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I've yet to see anybody take 30 seconds to get from the beginning of his run to launching...
    I certainly hope not. If we're talking about blind long jumpers for instance, that would make the run-up 200 metres or more! :D By the time he reached the jump he'd be too tired to get off the ground!
     

    seap

    New Member
    English
    My apologies! I hadn't actually looked at the original post when I said that :eek:. "Twenty-five seconds into his time allocation" certainly refers to the amount of time that the athlete is given to complete the task.
     
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