abound me?

  • Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    ". . . the support that has abounded me" doesn't make any sense. Have you looked up the word "abound" in our dictionary? (Access via the search box at the top of the page.)
     

    Copperknickers

    Senior Member
    Scotland - Scots and English
    For those of us without psychic powers, could you please reveal to us the context which has made you so certain that this sentence is incorrect? :p

    We always ask for context, Rootin' Tootin'. Maybe this usage is incorrect, maybe it's an old-fashioned usage, maybe it's a regional dialect. We can't say unless we know where it comes from.
     

    Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    For those of us without psychic powers, could you please reveal to us your supernatural knowledge which has made you so certain that this sentence is incorrect? :p
    If you can give me an example of where it would be correct I will happily eat my word. And even if you can, I'm extrememy confident that it's not the context rootin' tootin' had in mind.
     

    Copperknickers

    Senior Member
    Scotland - Scots and English
    It's an intransitive verb, for one thing....
    2 Corinthians 9:8 "and God is able to make all grace abound unto you..."

    That's still an intransitive usage but it's a little different to today's usage. It would once have been regarded as correct to say 'thank you for the support which has abounded unto me', and it is not a major leap from there to remove the 'unto' (the bible is full of examples of uses of the word 'unto' which would be redundant today, e.g. 'give them' rather than 'give unto them'). So it would be incorrect to say 'abounded me' in modern English, but if this sentence is an excerpt from a historical work or a conscious archaicism then it is not necessarily incorrect.
     
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