about afraid

sunsail

Senior Member
de langue Turc
Hello

I watched a dialogue in a movie.Someone tries to kill computer and computer begs and says

"I am afraid Dave"
Dave is the person trying to kill computer.

Should it be saying "I fear"?

Regards
 
  • MJSinLondon

    Senior Member
    English - UK (London)
    Hello

    I watched a dialogue in a movie.Someone tries to kill computer and computer begs and says

    "I am afraid Dave"
    Dave is the person trying to kill computer.

    Should it be saying "I fear"?

    Regards
    'I am afraid, Dave' (note the comma) sounds fine to me. Without more context it is difficult to help you further.
     

    catgrin

    Senior Member
    I know the movie you saw, and the first version is correct. The correctly written statement is, "I am afraid, Dave." The computer is addressing Dave about its fear of dying. It is not Dave that the computer is afraid of. It is self aware, and is afraid of death.

    The statement, "I am afraid," means that something has frightened you. There is a sense of immediacy. It is happening now.

    The statement, "I fear," means that you have a fear. It is a part of you and there is no time associated with it.

    A person (or other self aware being) may always be aware of death, and may even have a fear of death that is deep within them. That fear is different from a fear of impending death. In the case of the movie, the computer has only just become self aware, and is soon after being killed. In that short time, it is actively afraid, and it tells Dave about its recognition of the emotion.
     

    sunsail

    Senior Member
    de langue Turc
    'I am afraid, Dave' (note the comma) sounds fine to me. Without more context it is difficult to help you further.
    Why do you need context for this case? It is a part from 2001:A Space Odyssey
    There are Dave and computer.Dave tries to power computer off and computer says that?

    If computer says

    I fear, Dave or I scare ,Dave would these work?

    Regards
     

    sunsail

    Senior Member
    de langue Turc
    I know the movie you saw, and the first version is correct. The correctly written statement is, "I am afraid, Dave." The computer is addressing Dave about its fear of dying. It is not Dave that the computer is afraid of. It is self aware, and is afraid of death.

    The statement, "I am afraid," means that something has frightened you. There is a sense of immediacy. It is happening now.

    The statement, "I fear," means that you have a fear. It is a part of you and there is no time associated with it.

    A person (or other self aware being) may always be aware of death, and may even have a fear of death that is deep within them. That fear is different from a fear of impending death. In the case of the movie, the computer has only just become self aware, and is soon after being killed. In that short time, it is actively afraid, and it tells Dave about its recognition of the emotion.
    According to your explanation in the swimming pool if trainer ask whether there is someone who is afraif of water, trainer makes a mistake right?
    This fear is not instant so trainer must be asking whether there is someone who fears of water?

    Regards
     

    catgrin

    Senior Member
    Here is what those statements would mean:

    "I fear, Dave" - would mean HAL has a general fear that is there all the time, something ongoing, not a direct response to dying.

    "I scare, Dave" - Would mean that HAL is saying he has the ability to scare others.
     

    sunsail

    Senior Member
    de langue Turc
    Here is what those statements would mean:

    "I fear, Dave" - would mean HAL has a general fear that is there all the time, something ongoing, not a direct response to dying.

    "I scare, Dave" - Would mean that HAL is saying he has the ability to scare others.
    "I scare,Dave" I gave this sample in this sense "to become frightened" not to scare others.
     

    catgrin

    Senior Member
    According to your explanation in the swimming pool if trainer ask whether there is someone who is afraif of water, trainer makes a mistake right?
    This fear is not instant so trainer must be asking whether there is someone who fears of water?

    Regards

    Either could be correct. I hope this will help explain:

    In that situation, the trainer could either say, "Is there anyone with a fear of water?" (meaning they have an ongoing fear that they know about)

    or

    "Is there anyone who is afraid of water?" (They are in a situation where an underlying fear comes to the surface. They will be actively afraid.)

    The words can frequently be exchanged, but in your movie example, all HAL says is, "I am afraid." This implies that something has made him afraid at that time. Because he has only recently become aware of his own existence and death, it is a new experience for him. He is telling Dave he has identified the emotion "fear" and is actively feeling it by being "afraid."
     

    sunsail

    Senior Member
    de langue Turc
    Either could be correct. I hope this will help explain:

    In that situation, the trainer could either say, "Is there anyone with a fear of water?" (meaning they have an ongoing fear that they know about)

    or

    "Is there anyone who is afraid of water?" (They are in a situation where an underlying fear comes to the surface. They will be actively afraid.)

    The words can frequently be exchanged, but in your movie example, all HAL says is, "I am afraid." This implies that something has made him afraid at that time. Because he has only recently become aware of his own existence and death, it is a new experience for him. He is telling Dave he has identified the emotion "fear" and is actively feeling it by being "afraid."
    Thank you for broad explanation.So I should use "afraid" for momentarily fears briefly?
     

    catgrin

    Senior Member
    "I scare,Dave" I gave this sample in this sense "to become frightened" not to scare others.
    I understood your meaning, but in the usage, "I scare" means you actively scare.

    Here are some sentences to help with this:

    1. "I scare." means subject does verb

    2. "I scare people." means subject does verb to predicate

    3. "Dogs scare me." means subject does verb to predicate

    The only sentence where "I" am being scared is the third, where "dogs" (subject) do the action of scaring (verb) me (predicate).

    To "become frightened" something must frighten you. If you frighten yourself, the correct sentence is, "I scare me."

    For the movie, death scares HAL, so if you want to write out what is scaring HAL it would be, "Death scares me, Dave." or "I am afraid of death, Dave."
     

    catgrin

    Senior Member
    Thank you for broad explanation.So I should use "afraid" for momentarily fears briefly?
    Yes, when something has actively made you feel a fear, it is correct to say "___ has made me afraid" or "I am afraid of ____."

    When you have a longstanding or preexisting fear, like one from childhood, it is appropriate to say, "I fear ____." In that situation, you can also say, "I am afraid of ____" because you currently know of and have that fear.

    -------

    NOTE:

    I hope this doesn't confuse you further. One more way the words are used:

    "afraid" can sometimes be used as a colloquialism in place of "I harbor reservations". For example, "I am afraid it is going to rain." does not imply literal fear. It suggests dismay or displeasure with a possibility.

    In BE "fear" is sometimes used in this way. "I fear it is going to rain," is an example. In AE, "fear" is rarely used this way.
     

    sunsail

    Senior Member
    de langue Turc
    I understood your meaning, but in the usage, "I scare" means you actively scare.

    Here are some sentences to help with this:

    1. "I scare." means subject does verb

    2. "I scare people." means subject does verb to predicate

    3. "Dogs scare me." means subject does verb to predicate

    The only sentence where "I" am being scared is the third, where "dogs" (subject) do the action of scaring (verb) me (predicate).

    To "become frightened" something must frighten you. If you frighten yourself, the correct sentence is, "I scare me."

    For the movie, death scares HAL, so if you want to write out what is scaring HAL it would be, "Death scares me, Dave." or "I am afraid of death, Dave."
    I might be doing some mistake.I had checked on dictionary.com

    verb (used without object)
    2. to become frightened: That horse scares easily.

    if that is so,if deaths scares HAL why can HAL not say " I scare, Dave"?
     

    catgrin

    Senior Member
    I had forgotten the usage. It is not common, and mainly refers to animals which may become unexpectedly startled. You hear it most often in cowboy movies. It refers to farm animals like horses, mules, and cows. I've never heard it used in reference to a person.

    For other animals (and people), a correct form would be:
    2. verb with object, "That cat is scared easily." In that instance, what is done to the cat is that it is being scared.

    When you are speaking of yourself, it is not correct to say "I scare." You can say "I am scared." The scaring is done to you, you are not doing it to someone else.

    Here are sample sentences for each of dictionary.com's uses:

    1. Haunted houses scare me!

    2. That horse scares easily.

    3. The alarm gave us such a scare!

    4. For three months there was a war scare.

    5. Although she was broke, she scared up the money for the concert tickets.
     
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