about (around ? ) the pool

sunyaer

Senior Member
Chinese
This is a sentence I saw on a notice sign at a water playing pool:
"No person shall engage in boisterous play in or about the pool."

Does "around the pool" have the same meaning here as "about the pool" here?
 
  • sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    This is a sentence I saw on a notice sign at a water playing pool:
    "No person shall engage in boisterous play in or about the pool."

    Does "around the pool" have the same meaning here as "about the pool" here?
    Probably, but although you don't say where you saw it, I'm guessing it's something written by a non-native, (probably Chinese) and in that case, your guess is as good as ours.

    For example: I guess it means "no loud laughing," but that doesn't make sense.... :)
     
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    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I reluctantly disagree with SDGraham. I don't think it was written by a non-native speaker. For one thing, it's grammatically correct. I think the nonspecific word "boisterous" was chosen so as to leave the nature of the behavior open to the management's interpretation/discretion when deciding whether or not it qualifies an individual for ejection.
     

    Wordsmyth

    Senior Member
    Native language: English (BrE)
    I do agree with sdg: not because it's incorrect (because, as you say, Parla, it isn't), but because I can't imagine a native speaker putting that on a sign! It reads like an extract from the terms and conditions of use, probably written by a lawyer (such as may be consulted upon request to the appropriate authorities, and which, in case of contravention, may be cited in a court of law;)). A sign would be more likely to read "No boisterous play in or around the pool".

    Even the "in or about" has a ring of 'legalese'; but yes, sunyaer, it means exactly the same as "in or around".

    Ws:)
     

    sunyaer

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Probably, but although you don't say where you saw it, I'm guessing it's something written by a non-native, (probably Chinese) and in that case, your guess is as good as ours.

    For example: I guess it means "no loud laughing," but that doesn't make sense.... :)
    That is on a sign inside Great Wolf Lodge in Niagara Falls, Canada. But I have no idea if that was written by a non-native speaker, which would be the case if all native speakers were busy with other things and had no time to write proper English for their business.

    But my question is about "about the pool", which I feel is more appropriate than "around the pool" in the context. Your comments please?

    Please see attached file for the sign.
     

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    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I do agree with sdg: not because it's incorrect (because, as you say, Parla, it isn't), but because I can't imagine a native speaker putting that on a sign! It reads like an extract from the terms and conditions of use, probably written by a lawyer (such as may be consulted upon request to the appropriate authorities, and which, in case of contravention, may be cited in a court of law;)). A sign would be more likely to read "No boisterous play in or around the pool".

    Even the "in or about" has a ring of 'legalese'; but yes, sunyaer, it means exactly the same as "in or around".

    Ws:)

    I should have included lawyers as non-native speakers since their writings often are far from normal English. :)

    Click HERE for a comprehensive display of common swimming-pool signs. (I find no "boisterous" in the lot).
     
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