About development.

Shadik hasan

Senior Member
Bangla
*If we look at the developed countries, we find that the root of their development(1) is education. An educated nation can take the country to the highest pick of development(2). People in general can achieve overall development(3) in their life.

*The development(4) of our country depends on us.

*We should takes many steps for the development(5) of our country.

Are the above statements correct?

If correct, please tell me the uses of development here,
1.isn't they already developed? or their day by day development= process/action.
2.here it doesn't mean any process? Is it used as an abstract noun?
3.it also mean no process. What is called in this sense? Or, should i use the countable form of development?
4.here development means process/action.
5.here also mean process. 'We should take many steps for developing our country'

Actually i want to know when a noun doesn't mean any process then, it means only the noun(or state), i mean to say no 'process meaning'?

Thank you.
 
  • Chez

    Senior Member
    English English
    IfI don't understand your problem.

    Development remains the same (noun) throughout.

    If you add a verb e.g. seek/achieve/work for etc. then you are talking about an action or process to reach the end-state of being developed.
     

    Shadik hasan

    Senior Member
    Bangla
    IfI don't understand your problem.

    Development remains the same (noun) throughout.

    If you add a verb e.g. seek/achieve/work for etc. then you are talking about an action or process to reach the end-state of being developed.
    Sorry,
    Which action or process?

    I always think development as the 'whole action' of developing.
     
    Last edited:

    Chez

    Senior Member
    English English
    We should take many steps for the development of our country.- here i know "for developing our country" we should take many steps. Or should i think 'development' 'the end state of being developed". Or both?

    In order to develop our country we should take many steps. :tick:

    I suppose 'development' is not an 'end state' – because you can continue developing.

    But in terms like 'developed countries' it means that the process of development In terms on modernisation etc) has been completed.

    It depends on the individual sentence and context whether you think of it as a 'process' or a completed state.
     

    Shadik hasan

    Senior Member
    Bangla
    We should take many steps for the development of our country.- here i know "for developing our country" we should take many steps. Or should i think 'development' 'the end state of being developed". Or both?

    In order to develop our country we should take many steps. :tick:

    I suppose 'development' is not an 'end state' – because you can continue developing.

    But in terms like 'developed countries' it means that the process of development In terms on modernisation etc) has been completed.

    It depends on the individual sentence and context whether you think of it as a 'process' or a completed state.
    Thank you.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    What you seem to be talking about is the fact that development – like many other nouns – can be used both uncountably (to signify the process of developing/being developed, or the state of having been developed) and countably (as a specific example of something that has been developed/constructed/created).
     

    Shadik hasan

    Senior Member
    Bangla
    What you seem to be talking about is the fact that development – like many other nouns – can be used both uncountably (to signify the process of developing/being developed, or the state of having been developed)
    Does' the state of having been developed' mean the state is already developed?
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    And I thought I’d explained that!

    “Having been developed” is a way of describing something that has been developed, the development of which has already taken place.


    But the phrase “the state of having been developed” doesn’t mean that someone developed a state. :eek:
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    That’s another way of saying the same thing, but it works more like an adjective – it is developed/ready/complete.
     
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