About handwriting: 血、自, etc.

Bradgiarco

Member
Castellano/Catalán - Barcelon
Hello,

As I explained here, I was wondering if you could tell me which one is the "mainstream" form in handwriting (if any), or the most common (if any), or if maybe some are just used in computer fonts and not in handwriting; the kanji is just an example that contains the stroke marked in red in the last kanji variant:

chi.jpg


Thanks in advance.
 
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  • Flaminius

    coclea mod
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    No problem with the second two, but the part of the first stroke that crosses over 皿 shouldn’t be any longer.

    The third specimen seems wrong to me. It loses connection with the second stroke, which is a short vertical down on the left.
     

    Bradgiarco

    Member
    Castellano/Catalán - Barcelon
    Hi again,

    I'd like to ask if it's the same way in all kanji that have this first stroke (don't know if it has a name). For example, the pictures attached are from a dictionary: as you said, in the case of 血 it's exactly in the corner, but it's not the case of 自 or 向 (I can't think of more kanji with this stroke). Is it just a coincidence (since they are pictures to imitate handwriting), or in fact it's written differently (school-wise speaking I mean).

    Thank you again.

    Best wishes.

    chi iphone.jpg
    jibun iphone.jpg
    mukau iphone.jpg
     

    Flaminius

    coclea mod
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    Hello,

    I think I should reassure you that a lot of differences you pointed out are trivial. The education sector has been repeatedly told by the government that shapes of characters allow for considerable variance. The latest proposal is still in draught but has been widely read (文化庁 [Agency of Cultural Affairs]: 2016「常用漢字表の字体・字形に関する指針(報告)について」).

    It is largely a matter of design and taste whether or not to have the first stroke seamlessly continue into the second in 自 and 向. I don't find exact letters in collections I have access to, but here is a pre-war textbook that explains how 白 should be written out:
    二画は一画の啄をそのまま直ぐに承ける画である。
    スクリーンショット(2018-08-08 0.06.00).png


    Finally, I reexamined why I thought the right-hand sample in your first post seemed wrong. It's more the starting point of the first stroke than where it finishes that feels strange. It starts at a point too further right than I am comfortable with. When I mentally shorten the first stroke, the letter does not look wrong, even with the first touches the middle point of the third stroke. I am sorry if I threw you off.
     

    SoLaTiDoberman

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Hello,

    As I explained here, I was wondering if you could tell me which one is the "mainstream" form in handwriting (if any), or the most common (if any), or if maybe some are just used in computer fonts and not in handwriting; the kanji is just an example that contains the stroke marked in red in the last kanji variant:

    View attachment 26854
    crosses :cross:
    doesn't cross:tick::thumbsup:
    center:cross:

    Thanks in advance.
    In my opinion, the first stroke of 白、血、向、自 or any other same pattern kanjis should be hand-written in the "doesn't cross" version. It's the only natural version for me.
     

    Bradgiarco

    Member
    Castellano/Catalán - Barcelon
    Hi,

    Thanks to both of you for your replies.

    I think I should reassure you that a lot of differences you pointed out are trivial
    Yes, do not misunderstand me, I guessed (and I understood what you meant) that it's not relevant if a stroke is 2mm displaced.
    My point was, given the fact that these images are computer-made (despite designed to imitate handwriting), the fact that one is exactly in the corner and the other ones aren't led me to think that perhaps when "taught at school", "what the rules say" is that there are some kanji where this stroke ends on the corner and some others where it doesn't. I insist, despite the fact that I got that it's not important in practise.

    It is largely a matter of design and taste whether or not to have the first stroke seamlessly continue into the second in 自 and 向
    I understand now that there isn't this difference "in teaching" I was wondering about.

    I am sorry if I threw you off.
    Not at all!

    Thanks again for your time,

    Regards.
     
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