about "hence"

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Nadae

Member
China
Suppose I have a group of statements, and if statement 1 is correct, so are the other statements.

Can I express it as "statement 1 is correct, hence the other statements"?

Is "hence" OK here?

Much obliged:)
 
  • cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Hello Nadae,

    If you and your listeners or readers have a prior agreement that the correctness of statement 1 necessarily implies that the other statements are correct, you may state,

    "Claim one is correct, hence the other claims are also correct."

    or

    "Claim one is correct, hence the other claims are also."

    or


    "Claim one is correct, hence the other claims are."
     

    padredeocho

    Banned
    United States
    Suppose I have a group of statements, and if statement 1 is correct, so are the other statements.

    Can I express it as "statement 1 is correct, hence the other statements"?

    Is "hence" OK here?

    Much obliged:)
    HENCE usually means BECAUSE OF THAT/FOR THAT REASON

    The boy was late to work for the umpteenth time, hence, his was fired.
    It was raining, hence, I brought an umbrella.
     

    LV4-26

    Senior Member
    Can I add my own question to Nadae's?

    Can you use hence with just a noun phrase following?
    Imagine I'm describing a car crash. Can I say something like
    The driver was not paying attention. Hence the accident.
    ?
    (which would be an elliptic way of saying "that's how the crash took place").
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    I actually prefer to see/hear hence followed by a noun, or a phrase that starts with a noun, as in LV4's and Cuchuflete's examples. Not sure why.
    Perhaps it's just personal opinion but for unknown reasons (again) I don't much like Padredeocho's examples, in which I would've used that's why instead of hence.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Can I add my own question to Nadae's? You have. ;)

    Can you use hence with just a noun phrase following?

    The driver was not paying attention. Hence the accident.
    Obviously it is not a full sentence. Hence your question.

    This is a construction that works in speech, because both speaker and listener know
    to "hear" the unspoken verb or verb phrases. It is not grammatically correct, but
    communicates clearly. It should be avoided in formal writing.
     
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